Attaching rubber tubing to faucets?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by MenacingTourist, Aug 19, 2009.

  1. MenacingTourist

    MenacingTourist Member

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    I'm actually getting to the point in my yearlong (and then some) darkroom sink project that I'm thinking about where the water actually comes out the faucets.
    I have some "Y" faucets that have threaded ends and are normally used for garden hoses. I'm now wondering how some of you have attached rubber tubing to those ends. Or even options other than rubber tubing.

    Thanks,

    Alan.
     
  2. Bill Mobbs

    Bill Mobbs Member

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    What about washing machine hoses....... They just a short version of a garden hose. Repair fittings are available to make your own too. Home Depot or Lowes comes to mind.


    bill
     
  3. djhopscotch

    djhopscotch Member

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    I just used a reduction fitting with a nipple at the end of it. Then used a hose clamp to keep the tubing on the nipple. Not super pretty but functional.
     
  4. fotch

    fotch Member

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    There are so many ways, it would be worth taking a trip to a hardware store. Note! The big box stores may have similar items however, your more likely to find someone knowledgeable at a old fashion type hardware store.

    Basically, you will look for a threaded hose adapter that allows for a size (several different size are available) of rubber or plastic hose to be clamped to it. Does that make sense?

    Good Luck
     
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  5. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    Unscrew the aireator from the faucet, if it has one. Take the threaded portion to your hardware store or home center, and generally they will have adaptors that will provide a hose thread. Another similar option is to get a portable dishwasher hose adaptor, or quick-disconnect.
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    it's a darkroom, can you use English please, attaching a rubber pipe to a tap is rather easy.

    On the other hand if you want faucet I'll come "force t" somewhere else but you might not enjoy it :D

    Ian.
     
  7. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    You can get an adapter from a garden hose fitting to standard pipe thread, and from pipe thread to a hose barb for rubber tubing.

    I posted a photo in this post. Here I'm going from a shower to a Delta 1 temperature gauge, which ends in a hose fitting, and from that I've got a 4-hose manifold with different sized tubing fittings for different purposes (garden hose for washing trays and filling things, print washer, film washer, and small hose as a rinse for local bleaching and other finer tasks)--

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/53114-best-piece-equipment-4.html#post667266
     
  8. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Someone is a bit touchy today, aren't we?

    Steve
     
  9. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    If you are really desperate, an option for a DIY connection is the following:

    Self amalgamating plastic tape (also called SAP tape) is a product usually used for high voltage electrical insulation. There are liner and linerless (think of things like separator sheets between dry mount tissue) versions made. Home Depot sells a linerless version.

    You unpeel a length from the rolll, stretch it moderately to activate it, and then wind it on. After a few minutes it totally fuses into one piece of rubber.

    It is soft, so I have reinforced it with fibreglass backed packing tape, and then wound another layer of SAP on to keep the fibreglass dry.

    Then I fit a worm gear hose clamp to fit the 'hose adapter' to the faucet bib. I have used this method to fit a kodak tray syphon to a bathtub filler many years ago. I made a form out of a plastic pop bottle top taper and regular vinyl electrical tape to wind the first layer of SAP on.
     
  10. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    hi alan

    you can find what is called a "barbed push on adapter"
    probably at a place that sells plumbing supplies near you
    i just googled the terms : hose fitting + adapter ...
    and found nice ones that cost about $2
    http://www1.mscdirect.com/Barbed---...plings/Hose,-Tube-&-Fittings/s0000000829.HTML

    granted brass is probably overkill :smile:
    so one near you will have very inexpensive plastic ones
    i think i found one near me for about 40ยข a few years ago
    you might be able to find one with a thermometer fitting
    so you can have your water temp right there ..
    i have one like that and it is great ...


    good luck!
    john
     
  11. eli griggs

    eli griggs Member

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    First thing, buy a MALE faucet adapter to use on your tap. Also you need to buy a FEMALE Bluebird type plastic, replacement garden hose fitting at the hardware/home center and a length of tubing, by the foot, and in three minutes you've got an adapter. Go ahead and buy some rubber washers of different thickness in case the adapter needs tweaking.

    Here is a link to an article that shows this type fitting. http://www.ehow.com/how_16199_replace-end-fitting.html


    Eli
     
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  12. John Jarosz

    John Jarosz Member

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    I use surgical latex type tubing. McMaster has it, and push-on barbed plastic fittings. When I piped my darkroom, all the faucets are hose bibb connection threaded, so it's easy to find the push-on barbed fittings that screw on.

    John
     
  13. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    What you'll find is that not all darkroom equipment uses the same size fittings. Many darkroom things ultimately expect to connect to a garden hose fitting it seems, but the water inlet on a print washer or a film washer or a water jacket or a tray siphon isn't guaranteed to be any particular size.
     
  14. eli griggs

    eli griggs Member

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    Lowes and Home Depot sell "John Guest" plastic and brass fittings, adapters, connectors and reducers, some of which are simple press and fit affairs. I used these and other common plumbing fittings to run water from my laundry room and a 1/4ID plastic tubing through the crawl-space under the house to the far end bedroom which I converted to my darkroom. Likewise, I used a combination of fittings to reduce the drain of a Delta darkroom sink to a 3/8ID plastic tube alone the same rout to the washing machine drain, which is at a lower elevation than the sink.

    Your sink faucet most likely has a screw-on fitting with a screen insert. Take this to the home center and the plumbing department will set you up with everything you need. If you need smaller hoses for washers, etc, simply have them find the right reducers and tubing at the same time, you'll just need to know the inlet/outlet OD and ID specs of the washers.

    This stuff is very simple if you go to a good home center and ask for help. It's not too expensive either, though the "Y" fitings and reducers for my washing machine hot and cold water faucets take-offs did get up to about $80US, including the tubing.

    Eli
     
  15. MenacingTourist

    MenacingTourist Member

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    Thank you all for your replies. Great ideas all...even Ian's. I should stop talking about it and just do it.

    To be clear I was looking to use the surgical tubing attached to something very similar to what David Goldfarb has. I'll post pics when it's set up.

    Thanks again,

    Alan.
     
  16. MenacingTourist

    MenacingTourist Member

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  17. jeroldharter

    jeroldharter Member

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  18. RJS

    RJS Member

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    I like to use surgical tubing from the hardware store on a barbed fitting. The surgical tubing is so flexible it will point about anywhere - just don't turn the water on too hard oryou have an untamed snake!
     
  19. michaelbsc

    michaelbsc Member

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    Man do you guys make it hard. Just go to a pet store and get a dog shampoo hose. It's a rubber do-hicky that just pushed on the end of the faucet. Pull the little shower end off the other end and you have an instant hose.
     
  20. pnance

    pnance Member

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    I ended the water pipe (from the filter) with a standard water hose connection, used a adapter (from Harbor Freight) that gives 4 outlets, each with its own valve. Used the adapter from Lowe's that goes from water hose connection to a tubing, by sizing it right (or just luck) it doesn't need a clamp. I use one to go to the print washer, one for when washing film, plus have two spares.

    Paul
     
  21. eli griggs

    eli griggs Member

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    Michael, I don't think this would've worked for the 60 plus feet I needed for three lines under the house to the utility room, at least where I could be sure nothing's leaking. :wink:

    Eli
     
  22. pnance

    pnance Member

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    Image of water manifold

    Shows water hookups
     

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  23. Xmas

    Xmas Member

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    It is also bad usage faucet is more correct, lots of people this side of the pond would say faucet, e.g. in Scotland, it is becoming, has become, archic in England.

    Languages do change and lots of people would be confused if you visit as a tourist, and tried to purchase one. We only use 'tap' in an engineering shop in the 'more correct' i.e. older sense.

    I think the quote is 'two people separated by a common language'.

    Noel
     
  24. haclil

    haclil Member

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    Surgical tubing is great but not if you will be closing off the business end to stop the water for any period of time. That may be unlikely; just be aware that latex is enormously stretchy. Even a thin stream of water will turn the closed-off tube into a big knockwurst and then into a bomb!

    BTW I'm pretty impressed with the erudite responses including John Jarosz'.
     
  25. KenM

    KenM Member

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    I use surgical tubing in my darkroom - water exits from the temperature unit, and drops into a PVC pipe, which splits into two pipes, each of which runs along the leading edge of each sink. I have multiple drop points, with a valve at each point, with the tubing coming off of that. I can then access water at multiple points along the sink without going back to the mains....

    But, as is mentioned above, you have to make sure that you don't obstruct the tubing at all. If you do block it off, it will stretch. If you catch it in time, you'll be fine, but you'll create a weak point in the tubing which will be prone to 'expanding', and eventually bursting. Don't ask me how I know this. :D

    I will say, it's amazing how much stretch latex tubing has in it :D :D