Avoiding breaking ground glass while hiking.

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Kevin Kehler, May 13, 2013.

  1. Kevin Kehler

    Kevin Kehler Member

    Messages:
    605
    Joined:
    May 14, 2008
    Location:
    Regina Canad
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I recently purchased a Lowepro Rover Pro hiking backpack, as I am getting into doing more hiking. Since I am wanting to take my 5x7 with me, I have become concerned that the ground glass might break once everything is loaded in the bag and I start walking. Is there a practical way of protecting the glass? I would fold the camera up as much as possible but should I put some cloth over the glass or put the back in a separate compartment to ensure it's safety? Even a large padded envelope? I have a 4x5 back I bring as well. Just the camera, holders, tripod and bag are almost 30lbs already, so I am trying to keep the weight down.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

    Messages:
    2,057
    Joined:
    May 6, 2013
    Location:
    US
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    If the groundglass is at all recessed in the frame, how about getting a sheet of thin wood of some kind at the hobby store, cut it to size, and jam it in the frame, perhaps with some foam or something attached to the edges so it will keep itself jammed in there but easy enough to snag a corner and pull it out. Or use some big rubber bands around the camera to hold it there.
     
  3. Doremus Scudder

    Doremus Scudder Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2002
    Location:
    Oregon and Austria
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
  4. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

    Messages:
    2,144
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Firewall plywood from the hobby shop is an answer. Don't rest it on the glass. Hold it against the back of the camera with rubber bands.
    Another alternative, and even lighter, is thin plastic from a plastics dealer. Hold it above a heat source, be careful you are not too close, and bend it so that one side can be slid into the camera where the film holders go.
     
  5. Terry Christian

    Terry Christian Subscriber

    Messages:
    696
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2011
    Location:
    Memphis, TN
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I made a protector like the one Tom1956 mentioned. I cut two pieces of Lexan plexiglas, one slightly smaller than the other to fit into the camera like a film holder. I then made a hinge out of gaffer's tape to connect them, and i use a ball bungee to wrap around them and the ground glass on the camera. It works well for my Calumet monorail.
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,039
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    On many LF cameras the focus hood doubles as a screen protector. I'd not seen the protectors Doremus links to but they look ideal.

    Ian
     
  7. pgomena

    pgomena Member

    Messages:
    1,382
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, Or
    I made a protector for my 8x10 a few years ago by cutting a piece of scrap 1/8" mahogany plywood ("lauan" or 1/8" "door skin") to the appropriate size and shape with a kraft knife and gluing a piece of felt to the side that faced the glass. I put 4 small pieces of Velcro on it and the frame that holds the glass to hold it in place. Total cost about $2.00.
     
  8. Kevin Kehler

    Kevin Kehler Member

    Messages:
    605
    Joined:
    May 14, 2008
    Location:
    Regina Canad
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Thanks everyone, some great ideas. For reference, it is an Agfa Ansco field camera (not a monorail), so the rear extension can fold up to offer some protection. More or less, what I am hearing, is the basic idea of a insert that wraps around but does not actually touch the glass (or only the padding/felt) touches the glass. Does this provide enough protection from the regular bumps/knocks that walking would give? Perhaps the glass is stronger than I think but I just don't want to drive for 10-hours, hike for 5 and can't take the picture because of broken glass.
     
  9. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,714
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Bubble wrap?
     
  10. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,039
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    As it's an Agfa Ansco I'd make a bublle wrap piece - card/bunbble wrap to place between the rear extension and the camera back. I use 10x8 agfa Anscos and I don't envy you the weight !!!!

    Ian
     
  11. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

    Messages:
    829
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2012
    Location:
    County Durha
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I made a holder for my car type Satelite Navigation screen to fit onto my motorcycle. These are not as robust as the motorcycle versions so need protection. I hand carved a cradle out of expanded polystyrene into which the items fits quite snuglyand this gives it all the protection it needs.

    So get yourself self some expanded Polystyrene and make a holder for your glass. It will survive anything almost that you care to throw at it.
     
  12. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

    Messages:
    4,211
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Richmond/Geelong, AUS
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Place some thin closed cell foam padding between the glass and the holder once fitted; it will afford some shock protection. I would be surprised if anything breaks as I sometimes walk with others here using a 4x5 kit and never broken anything. You'd have to be pretty rough with the pack: falling, jumping, crashing, banging against trees, rocks etc., to bring about damage. A camera falling off a tripod head (I have seen it happen...) is an entirely different matter.
     
  13. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

    Messages:
    4,767
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2011
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    I've used polycarbonate, acrylic, and hobby plywood. Velcro buttons can be used to keep the barrier in place, or some camera backs will have
    some kind of other feature to keep the protective piece stationary. I wanted to do something a little cooler looking for my 8x10, so took some
    copper-clad PC board - thin, strong, and very stiff - and did a swirly true verdi gris color treatment on it. Guess I "spit-toned" it!