B&W on canvas, enlarging technics ????

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by almarn, Jul 27, 2009.

  1. almarn

    almarn Member

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    I am not a photographer by trade. I am a painter. My problem(s).

    I want to enlarge b&w shots (6x6 mainly) to canvas and large scale..Extremely precise definition is not that important

    I need photo emulsion, background will be acrylics. Which one ?

    Variable contrast ?

    Do I need an enlarger ? My first guess was to use my trusty Artograph Super Prism projector (2x250 watts photographic bulb and high-definition lense). Any idea here such as..

    Is it possible ?
    Exposure time (I know I need to run tests...)
    Filtration (if I am using variable contrast photo emulsion)

    thanks for any help.

    Alain,Montreal
     
  2. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    at the risk of creating a "storm", this is something i would use a hybrid method


    the issue with liquid emulsion on cansvas is not an easy technique to control if not impossible
     
  3. brofkand

    brofkand Member

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    You could do what Olan Mills did back in the day; paste a photographic print on a stretched canvas and coated it with mod podge or something horrid to make it look like an oil painting.

    Otherwise I agree a hybrid workflow would be best.

    You could start with a stretched canvas that has been primed with gesso, and apply a liquid emulsion to it. The problem is what effect the chemicals will have on the canvas. And if you try to stretch it after you develop the photograph, you'll have problems with the emulsion stretching.
     
  4. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    An alternative is to use Cyanotype - which works well on cloth - and then tone it in tannic acid to turn it to a warm-black tone. Untoned Cyanotype is prussian blue. The problem you will have with Cyanotype is you need a 1:1 negative - you don't say what size the final artwork will be. You can get enlarged negatives from a service bureau.
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    there is a company near me that
    will take a photographic image
    and peel off the top layer of the print
    then laminate it to canvas and stretch gallery-wrap that ...

    liquid light / liquid emulsion is OK but as ann suggested
    it can be tricky ... ( and be yellow from the subb layer ) ...