Begger VCCB print color inconsistent or just me?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by MMfoto, Mar 29, 2006.

  1. MMfoto

    MMfoto Member

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    I have been sometimes frustrated with trying to print for a certain shade of warmth to match an ongoing body of work. I use Bergger VCCB and usually develop in Zonal Pro HQ Warmtone 1:10. Sometimes I get the most wonderful dark caramel brown tones and other times I don't. I often print with overall print color being the deciding factor in exposer and filtration. With the current batch I'm printing from I am having an awfully hard time coaxing the warmth I'm looking for. For starters, I've long since discovered I get more consistent results by "salting" the fresh developer with 10-30% old developer. This time around I've tried doubling the dilution of developer to 1:20 AND salting 25% with old developer yet I'm only getting a conservative, slightly greenish warmth that doesn't even hint at the brown tones I'm looking for and have been used to. Any advice?
     
  2. fotod69

    fotod69 Member

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    I've used this paper for a while and even though I develop in Dektol 1:2 and tone in seleniun 1:20 I've found the color has the greenish quality you describe before toning. I get the best results in color by hypoclearing the print for 15 minutes followed and 90 minutes archival wash then seleniun toning followed by a 60 minutes wash. The color is wonderful from a slight warmth to a chocolate brown depending upon tone time ( 3 to 5 minutes). Good luck.
    Dennis
     
  3. nze

    nze Member

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    I get the same greenish cast but after a selenium toning ( 1+19) for 2-3 minutes I get a beautiful warm tone, longer time in selenium toner result in purplish warm
     
  4. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    Haven't used THAT paper or THAT developer.

    In general, however, time and temperature ( with a metol / carbonate +/- bromide developer ) are the variables to influence tone.

    Develop longer = cooler

    "Salting the developer" is an old technique that adds restrainer ( development byproducts ) to the process in an interesting way... without knowing exactly what is IN the Zonal Pro stuff, it's hard to guess what's going on... probably helping warm the image. I guess it would depend on what exactly was IN the paper.

    Dilution slows the process, and - generally - cools the image.

    If you were using one of many papers I AM familiar with I'd say:

    - Develop for 1 1/2 minutes for the warmest color

    - Use a higher concentration of developer.

    .
     
  5. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    I've used the Bergger paper extensively. I used to print it with Dektol, and got the greenish tinge. Toning will get rid of it of course, but I'd also recommend trying the new Ilford Warmtone developer if you want a rich chocolatey-brown tone to the print. You can also split-develop in the Warmtone and Cooltone developers to vary the look- start the print in whichever developer you want the shadows to look like, then finish for the highlights.