Begginer afraid of contact

Discussion in 'Contact Printing' started by Ricardo de Oliveira, Aug 19, 2013.

  1. Ricardo de Oliveira

    Ricardo de Oliveira Member

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    Hi,
    Yes, I'm reluctant to contact and enlarge a negative into ortho film at my adapted darkroom and I'm wondering if I will loose to much from my 2 1/4 (Tmax 100 with d-76) if I set up a copy stand and reshoot it, instead. The positive will be enlarged 10x10 max. To be used for kallitype and vandyke prints. Above average contrast and some grain are ok. Should I?
    Thanks for your attention. First time here. Lot's of good stuff.
    Ricardo
     
  2. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Hello and welcome to APUG. I am not sure what you are doing so will not offer advice, good luck.
     
  3. Ricardo de Oliveira

    Ricardo de Oliveira Member

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    Sorry. My Engrish fault. The question is: copy camera versus contact printing. Pros and cons.
     
  4. clayne

    clayne Member

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    Cons: no final product.
    Pros: final product.

    If you don't have a specific negative in the size you're trying to print, then by all means make an enlargement of it. There's no rules to follow here and nobody is going to think less of you for not having an 8x10 laying around.
     
  5. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    All you can do is try, there is no "fail" here, only experience will result.
     
  6. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser

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    hi ricardo

    which method are you enlarging your negatives?
    there is a great article here : http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/NbyR/nbyr.html
    i have never done this but from all reports from people who do this sort of thing it works well.
    i am not sure if this is an interest to you but you might go to DPUG.ORG for more "modern" enlarged negatives suggestions.
    i've enlarged negatives by making an enlargement and then a contact print of that enlargements ...
    and then going to a copy-store and having an inexpensive ( 10¢ ) xerox copy made that i then wax to make it translucent. (copy paper is thin and easy to print through, double weight paper not as much )

    it works well for cyanotypes :smile:

    good luck with your prints, sounds FUN !

    john
     
  7. Ricardo de Oliveira

    Ricardo de Oliveira Member

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    Hi everybody,
    I'm doing digital negatives ,for now, for my cyanotypes, etc. A-4 size max because my cheap printer is that small. I don't wanna go big bucks and buying an A3 printer, Cone Inks, Pictorico's A3's etc.
    I bring my Hasselblad 500 C to life again and thinked about enlarging the 2 1/4 negative (contact to positive first then enlarging the positive on ortho film) following Bob Herbst instructions on Unblinking Eye.
    But I have an adapted darkroom prone to dust, fibers etc and wondered about avoiding to contact the original neg into a positive and making a copy, instead, with my view camera - 6x7 back- and get a positive to, again, enlarge into ortho sheet film (10x10 max , in a 12x10 sheet). That's it. Will I loose to much definition camera copying a negative instead of contact printing?
    Thanks for your patience.
    Ricardo
     
  8. artonpaper

    artonpaper Subscriber

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    I've done both methods. I've photographed negatives on a light box. It is important to create a black mask so only the light coming through the negative reaches the lens. The room in which you are working should be kept as dark as possible. Also, depending on what lens you are using, you do not want to stop down to far. An aperture about half way works well. If you are using a lens designed for close focusing, then you can stop down further as a rule. Don't forget to calculate bellows extension factor and reciprocity failure if necessary. This will yield a film positive, unless you reversal process the film.

    In the darkroom you will probably need a neutral density filter so that you can get exposures that are not too short for your timer. I cut small strips of film and then test, just like when making a print. Then that film positive will have to be printed again. Same as with the camera lens, don't stop down all the way unless you have a very good APO lens. Make sure your finished negative reads right emulsion down.

    In both cases don't over develop. If you are new to this, keep notes, don't change more than one thing at a time, and be prepared to have to do it a few times to get it right. This sort of thing is a try and try again experiment. This how master printers become masterful. Do it until you get it right, keep notes and then you have mastered a new technique.

    best, Doug
     
  9. Ricardo de Oliveira

    Ricardo de Oliveira Member

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    Thank you, Doug.
    I'm aware there's a learning curve concerning everything you do in the lab. I would have to tame contact copying first to compare with the more friendly "reshoot in the light box" way. That's why I asked you experienced guys. I have already some mileage in the lab and yes, a notebook, is your best friend when you try to review a routine. I'm prepared to try again, and again, and again....
    All the best,
    Ricardo
     
  10. clayne

    clayne Member

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    This is one of the classic uses of ortho film but even in the absence of it you can still contact print to a fine grain film of equal size (you'll pick up contrast) to make an inter-positive using an enlarger or other well balanced light source. You can then enlarge that to any other film size you want creating the final inter-negative. You'll have to work in the dark for the actual exposure phases and both the pos and neg will of course need their own processing before each step.
     
  11. artonpaper

    artonpaper Subscriber

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    The link is to an example of a 35mm negative enlarged to about 8 x 10 in using a cold light source on an omega D Something enlarger. I used Plus-X and made a very dark positive in diluted paper developer. The developer was a liquid 1:9 kind used at the lab where I worked at the time. I actually mixed it 1:4. I made sure I could see through the darks, like the girls hair. I used the same set up to create the negative, but I contacted it. It was my first attempt at making enlarged negatives. The platinum-palladium Ziatype I made from the resulting negative comes remarkably close to in tonal range to the gelatin silver print I'd made previously. Other methods I've used included photographing a 4 x 5 negative on the light box and projecting that to 8 x 10. I've also had 120 film processed into a positive by DR-5 and projected that to 8 x 10.


    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showimage.php?i=58890&catid=member&imageuser=21598