Bergger BPF-200 film?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by RoyK, Oct 24, 2005.

  1. RoyK

    RoyK Member

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  2. mark

    mark Member

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    Depends on what you consider good. This is the same as JandC classic 200. I really like it in the right conditions. it has very little expansion. maybe +1.5 I have yet to get it beyond +1 with pyrocat HD

    I use POP which needs a really contrasty neg. In the right light I find the negs to be exquisit.

    I do not know about regular silver printing maybe someone who has used it for that can tell you.
     
  3. NER

    NER Member

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    BPF 200 is an excellent film.
     
  4. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    It is made by Forte and there is some debate as to whether it is identical to their 200 speed film or not. If it is, and I suspect so, than there are much cheaper sources for it that from Bergger, who charge a premium for the film. I don't think you are likely to order from them in Norway, but J&C's version sells for about half the price. As does the house brand from Freestyle, which is also the same thing.
     
  5. Donald Miller

    Donald Miller Member

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    I have used and do not like BPF 200. It is hyped far beyond it's inherent characteristics. It sucks badly insofar as it's ability to build density range.
     
  6. Terrance Hounsell

    Terrance Hounsell Member

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    I recently did an informal comparison by loading BPF 200 in 15 odd numbered holders and then 15 sheets of TMX in the flip side (even numbered holders). I shot the same images using both films one after the other. The exposures were based on BPF 200 rated at 100 ISO and TMX 100 rated at 50. All were processed processed in D-23. The difference was night and day. The TMX had at least a full stop more shadow detail. Can't see myself buying too much more BPF 200. But try it for yourself as the diet adverts say "Indiviual result may vary". You may find the "Look" suitable for vintage style photographs.
     
  7. Trond

    Trond Subscriber

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    Hi Roy!

    I have a few sheets of this film (JandC classic 200), just send me a PM if you want to try it out before you by a box. I'm located in Oslo as well.

    Trond
     
  8. Peter De Smidt

    Peter De Smidt Member

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    I've used it a little. It's more a 50-80 EI film; and when developed normally, it's grain is larger than HP5+ and Tri-x, both of which are significantly faster. I used it in 4x5, and it would be OK at 16x20 for N development, but no larger (in my opinion, of course.) That said, it looks pretty good in PMK. For N+ development or roll-film use, I'd avoid it like the plaque, unless you were going for a grainy look. (I like grainy film, but not when I'm shooting large format.)
     
  9. sanking

    sanking Member

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    My experience is that the *current* JandC 200 is the same film as *current* Forte 200 and Bergger BPF 200, though I have found some significant differences between emulson batches.

    For silver printing it is not a bad film. It can be developed to a CI of about .90, which allows for development down to about N+2, which should cover most all low contrast scenes for regular silver printing.

    If you are using alternative processes, including POP, I would recommend it only for high and medium contrast scenes. For low contrast scenes this film will not give enough contrast, without contrast controls, since the maximum CI does not allow enough contrast for anything less than about SBR 6 or N+1, when the ES of your process is log 1.75 greater, as is case with palladium, kallitype, POP, vandyke and salted paper.

    Sandy
     
  10. mark

    mark Member

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    And that would be the only time I use the film. That is why I said, in the right conditions it is a great film.
     
  11. Rlibersky

    Rlibersky Subscriber

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    I like this film. I have not had a problem with grain, 645 to a 16x20. 8x10 is never an issue with grain. I've not done any expansion so I can not commit on that. I put it upp against the JandC 200 and it wasn't even close to the same processing times. But both still very good film.
     
  12. Rolleijoe

    Rolleijoe Member

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    Bergger

    I found by comparing, that Bergger is not quite exactly Forte 200. Both processed @ the same time, of the same subjects, using a Rolleiflex w/Planar lens. I processed 2 rolls in HC-110 and 2 in Rodinal. Both were very good, with differeing tonal ranges. Compared also with Contax G of the same, and results similar. I can't say for 100% certainty that they are the same films, but the cost of Bergger just doesn't make it worth the extra $$.

    I haven't used the J&C films, they are the same as Fotoimpex in Berlin. Will try it when I go to Germany early next year.
    .
     
  13. jandc

    jandc Member

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    All you are seeing is batch to batch variations and the effects of time on the film. Name Brand A from batch X which is 2 years old will look different than Name Brand B from Batch Y which is fresh off the coating line. Both brands are the same film produced at different times. There is also a lot of Brand C out there that has sat on master rolls outside of Forte for 2+ years and then gets cut and labeled by third parties with a 3 year expiration date starting from the cut date and not the production date. This will look even more different and make you think it's a totally different film.