Bergger film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by DavidS, Jun 30, 2005.

  1. DavidS

    DavidS <div class="smallfont"><strong><em><font color="44

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    I just went to B&H and bought APX-100 135-36 Agfapan Professional Black & White Print Film. I also just bought a Canon EOS 3 35mm SLR Autofocus Camera and paid over $1200 for it. Looks like I'm getting serious about this... most if not all of Williamsburg, Brooklyn is under construction for some multi-million dollar condos...there are a lot of old, half-century apartment buildings being torn down in the way of progress..and I think my first attempt to bring those images to a portfolio. Wish me luck!
     
  2. geraldatwork

    geraldatwork Member

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    I'd like to see the photographs. When they are ready post them to one of the Galleries.
     
  3. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Good luck with the new camera. I'll also look forward to seeing the images. Was there a question about Bergger film in there?
     
  4. Carol

    Carol Member

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    I hope you get lots of pleasure from your new purchases. The more people using film, especially B&W, the better for all of us. Have fun.
     
  5. kiku

    kiku Subscriber

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    Bergger film?????
    Cordially, Kiku


     
  6. geraldatwork

    geraldatwork Member

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    It was in the heading "Bergger film". I was wondering this myself. Last year at the Photo EXPO at the Javits Center in New York City the US representative of the Bergger film gave me 2 rolls of 200 speed 35mm film to try out. Which I haven't. I was hoping he had an opinion about it.
     
  7. DavidS

    DavidS <div class="smallfont"><strong><em><font color="44

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    Actually, B&H had it a 10-pack of it on sale for $50. I don't know if it's compatible with the camera...
     
  8. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Compatible with the camera.
    That is a good one!!! LOL

    In the analog world there are no compatibility issues unless the size of the film is different, i.e. you cannot put 120 film in a 35mm camera but you could the other way around.

    As long as the film is 35mm it should work! But $50/10 is awfully pricey

    You bought a decent camera, and spent a good chunck of cash. The canon EOS is a very good camera, try not to use it in AUTo-Everything mode though. Auto-focus maybe a blessing but auto-exposure sometimes is not.

    Also hope you bought more than 1 roll of APX100 !

    Did you buy a developing tank/kit as well?
     
  9. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Was berger film rebranded forte?

     
  10. richardmellor

    richardmellor Member

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    bit off topic: whenever I am in N.Y.C I stop at b&h.
    and katzs deli in the lower east side ,great black and white photos on the wall . and the last place in north america that makes real pastrami sandwichs
    ...good luck with your film project
     
  11. geraldatwork

    geraldatwork Member

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    I wouldn't know. It was in a white Bergger Box with the usual info. I am tempted to try it. But I don't want to blow some potentially good street shots if I don't like or don't handle the film properly in processing. At the booth there were some beautifuly printed photos shot and printed on their products.
     
  12. David Brown

    David Brown Member

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    OMG! I've been eating fake pastrami! :surprised:
     
  13. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I like Katz's for pastrami, but The Carnegie Deli for corned beef.

    Bergger seems up to admitting that their film is made in the Forte plant, but they insist it is their own formula, last I read. I suspect it's no different from Forte/J&C Classic/ClassicPan.
     
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  15. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Fortepan 200 used to be an interesting film (i last shot it in 96). Dirt cheap in my country

    Nice tonality, harsh grain in D76 clone 1+1. Contrast could get easily out of hand though.
     
  16. DavidS

    DavidS <div class="smallfont"><strong><em><font color="44

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    In my business dealings with a few labs out of the city, I found a few that might be willing to help me develop my first attempt. I don't have the space to develop my own film...you have to remember, I live in a New York City apartment. It's 350 square feet for about $1600 a month. Three rooms, a kitchen, a living room and a bedroom. The bathroom is smaller than the stove I think...

    We'll see how I do with this. I'm a bit nervous actually...
     
  17. DavidS

    DavidS <div class="smallfont"><strong><em><font color="44

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    Ahhh...real food. Since I moved in with my girlfriend last year, I don't remember what that's like. Everything is tofu this, or sushi that...at least her father understands my pain. He just bought us a grill for 4th of July!!

    [qupte] ...good luck with your film project[/QUOTE]

    Hey, thanks...I need it.
     
  18. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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  19. geraldatwork

    geraldatwork Member

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    Actually its real easy, not expensive and everything you need to develop your own film can fit inside a milk crate sized box. Used everything you will need should cost about $50- $75 new about twice that. You might consider the C-41 films like Ilford XP2 Super. They can be processed by any consumer place that does color and you can enlarge the prints yourself at a later date.
     
  20. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Actually developing your own film it's a lot easier than you think and can be done in the kitchen sink.
    All you need is to load the developing tank in the bathroom (assuming it is dark) or in a changing bag or a closet.

    I see your point regarding commercial developers and it's usually good to ask them before hand what EI index to use for your film. If the guy says "it is too contrasty" then push your film 1 stop. If he says "it is too soft" pull it 1.
    IMHO there is no such thing as a contrasty film, just contrasty evelopment.


     
  21. DavidS

    DavidS <div class="smallfont"><strong><em><font color="44

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    photography paper

     
  22. DavidS

    DavidS <div class="smallfont"><strong><em><font color="44

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    photography paper

     
  23. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    But! but! Let us not forget about our Montreal's very own Schwartz who makes real smoked beef brisket on rye, and universally known as simply "smoked meat".

    We have authentic bagels too. :smile:
     
  24. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    You can process film easily with a changing bag, a daylight tank, a few bottles, a graduate, and a thermometer, but printing will be a little more involved and will require a dark space. If you check the "Darkroom Portraits" thread, you can see a couple of pictures of my Manhattan dark/bathroom to give you some ideas.

    Before worrying about what kind of paper you need (Ilford MGIV RC would be a good paper to start with), start by processing film.

    If you want to do your own contact sheets, that would be a good next step. All you would need would be a contact proofer (this is easiest with 35mm film, but you could also get by with a sheet of glass and a foam pad), and either trays or you could use a daylight print drum and roller base for processing if space is particularly tight. I usually set up three 11x14" trays plus a washer tray in my bathtub, and I can get creative and use three 16x20" trays, but for large prints up to 20x24", I have print drums.

    Once you get that far, you can have a lab make prints until you're ready to think about how to set up a darkroom in a small space.
     
  25. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Not necesarilly, you can develop your own film and use one of those digital thingies... scanners, to get the pictures in your computer

    Then you can go to a real darkroom to make prints.

    Developing film and making prints are 2 different steps that can be carried out separately

    When you decide is time to start printing I'd recoomend AGFA MC papers, the reisn coated is very good and I believe is excellent for beginners.

     
  26. geraldatwork

    geraldatwork Member

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    Sounds like you don't have any experience developing film. It sounds intimidating but is real easy. If you ever plan on being in Nassau County let me know. We can develop your film together so you can see what it is all about. I have D-76 and Rodinal so that should cover most film choices.