Best glue for camera leatherette

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by Chan Tran, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    I need to calibrate my camera shutter and it's necessary to remove a piece of the leatherette. I wonder what kind of glue would you recommend to glue it back?
     
  2. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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  3. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Try rubber cement first. If there is a problem later you can still peal off the leather.
     
  4. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    If you use Pliobond you can make it a bit more re-pealable by putting the glue on one surface and then joining the surfaces while the glue is still rather wetish. If you follow the instructions - apply to both surfaces and join under pressure when the glue has dried to a dry tack - the leatherette will be really stuck to the camera.
     
  5. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    I didn't think of mentioning that trick. It's a great one -- using a contact adhesive like it is rubber cement.
     
  6. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    Traditionally, shellac was used. I use gasket cement from NAPA auto parts. It is a traditional shellac cement. It can later be softened and removed with alcohol.
     
  7. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Thank you all! I think I will use the Pliobond.
     
  8. jk0592

    jk0592 Member

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    I used Pliobond to glue the leatherette on a Hasselblad with great success.
     
  9. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Pliobond.
     
  10. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

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    +1 for Pliobond. But note that it comes with dire warnings about breathing fumes. Also, it does tend to separate in the bottle and needs to be shaken.

    I have also found it at the hardware store (a more traditional one that seems to have one of everything).
     
  11. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Yes, don't pour it in a bag and huff it.:confused:

    The dire warnings are more for the benefit of lawyers the the guy replacing some leatherette on a camera, there's so little area to glue you don't need to worry about it. Unless you're cementing in batches of 50 or so.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2013
  12. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    Ah, great, I was wondering where to get the stuff. From my limited experience German camera makers tended to use shellac and Japanese used pressure adhesive.
     
  13. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Traditionally bone glues were used, at least here in the UK (they do look like shellac).

    The only problem with using Contact/Impact ahesives is sometimes the solvents can affect modern materials.

    Ian