Best linear polarising filter for 55mm thread wide angle lens

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by sherwin, Jan 11, 2011.

  1. sherwin

    sherwin Member

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    Hi,

    I'm using 55mm thread Minolta Rokkor lenses in front of my video camera - they are a 50mm 1.2, a 50mm 1.7 Macro and a 24mm 2.8. I am shooting a project outside on a sunny day and would like to use a polarising filter.

    In the digital imaging age, there is plenty of information about circular polarising filters but not much on linear polarising filters. I need several well-built linear polarising filters that will not cause too much vignetting - especially a concern on the 24mm lens. The image will hopefully make it to cinema screens so minimising distortion is also a concern.

    Any advice appreciated!
     
  2. dnjl

    dnjl Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2011
  3. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Subscriber

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    If you're looking for the best I'd go with B&W.
     
  4. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    What's the crop factor with your video camera? That is, how big is the sensor compared to 35x24mm. Vignetting won't be a problem with a significant crop factor.
    Thin-mount polarisers are made, for the purpose of avoiding vignetting.
     
  5. sherwin

    sherwin Member

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    thanks for the responses.

    lxdude, on my setup the crop factor is up to me. I can definitely zoom into the lens enough to lose the vignetting. At the moment this occurs at a point where my 24mm is more like a 30mm (this situation is the result of the adapter I must use to mount my lenses). Anyway, I am afraid that the polarizer will make this problem worse.

    I'm having trouble finding a thin (for wide angle lenses) linear polarizer amongst those brands.

    Here's what i've found:
    Cheap 2nd hand hoya -
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Hoya-Brand-55mm...era_Filters&hash=item230d38486d#ht_1484wt_907
    Expensive new B&W -
    http://cgi.ebay.com/B-W-55mm-TOP-LI...ra_Filters&hash=item1e59ccceb2#ht_2971wt_1141

    I guess i'll go with the Hoya?
     
  6. r-brian

    r-brian Member

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    Why are you looking for a linear model? If your video camera is autofocus there is a good chance the linear polarizer will interfer with the autofocus. They reason for circular polarizers is because of autofocus and/or beam splitting for the meter. A circular polarizer will work just fine.
     
  7. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I'll go with B&W filters.

    Jeff
     
  8. RobertV

    RobertV Member

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    Heliopan, their new Circular Pola filters take away only 1/2 f stop too!
     
  9. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    So, when you said you are mounting it on the front of your camera you meant literally in front of the lens already on it? If so, then what r-brian said applies.

    A thin mount polariser will reduce the chance of vignetting. Remember that with wide angle lenses the sky color can vary greatly from one side of the frame to the other when using a polariser.

    BTW: 50mm 1.7 Macro?
     
  10. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    How can that be?
     
  11. RobertV

    RobertV Member

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    Well, you can read that on their web site.
     
  12. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    Yes.

    But how could it be possible?
     
  13. RobertV

    RobertV Member

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    I do not know. I was informed about this on the Photokina in Köln by Mrs. Summers herself. One of the few new analog things overthere. Well, (X100), GF670W, TMY-2, T200, Fomalux 111, RPX 100/400 and a few other things.
     
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  15. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    Maybe you could ask her?

    It must be marketing talk: either that it is only 1/2 stop, or that it's a polarizer. Both can't be true.
     
  16. RobertV

    RobertV Member

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  17. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    Not "not".

    Yes, they know about light and polarisation.
    That makes it even more of a mystery why they say a polariser can have a 1/2 stop filter factor.

    Polarizers only use glass as covers, to protect the working bit: a 'plastic' foil.
     
  18. Pete H

    Pete H Member

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    With a linear polariser a simple energy argument gives at least one stop of loss. These are circular polarisers though. What is the angular spectrum of the incident light?
     
  19. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    Circular polarizers are linear polarizers. The effective bit is exactly the same.
    The difference is in what happens behind the filter, i.e. after the linear polarizer has done what linear polarizers do.
    Circular polarizers have an additional quarter wave retarder plate, which gives the polarisation vector a push, making it spin around the light's direction of travel.

    So at least one stop for circular polarizers too.
     
  20. sherwin

    sherwin Member

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    It appears this thread has taken a life of its own. How many stops of light the circular polarizer reduces isn't relevant to me because I only need a linear polarizer. I am using manual focus lenses and setting my video camera to manual focus and manual exposure (as anyone half-serious about film does). It's true that I'm mounting my Minolta lenses on top of the camera's inbuilt lens via an adapter but as I don't require the use of the camera's autofocus or metering systems, I do not require a circular polarizer. Correct?

    I'm deciding between the Hoya, B&W I previously listed and this Heliopan:
    http://www.foto-mueller.at/shop/hel...lar/heliopan-lineare-polarisationsfilter.html

    Gotta tell ya..I'm still tempted to go with Hoya..
     
  21. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    And why not. Should be good.
     
  22. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Just because you don't need a circular doesn't mean you should use a linear. The circular ones are basically all that anyone makes any more, so you might as well get a circular - there is no downside. What matters most is that (for you I guess) that it be "thin" (i.e. no front thread) and that it have multi-coating to reduce reflections and ghosting with high-contrast scenes.

    The Hoya HMC ones are good, the S-HMC and Zeta are apparently slightly better. Kenko is the brand used by Hoya in a few of their asian markets and is the exact same merchandise. B+W are great but poor value for money compared to the Hoyas. You can pay a bunch extra for a weather-sealed one ("B+W Kaesemann") too but I wouldn't bother.
     
  23. sherwin

    sherwin Member

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    thanks for the straight facts. I thought there would be a thing linear polarizer. I'll probably just go with Hoya or Kenko.

    Happy shooting,
    Sherwin
     
  24. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    There are two.

    ' Difficult' to combine two circular polarizers.

    And they cost (quite a bit) more.

    If you do not need a circular polarizer, don't get one.
     
  25. sherwin

    sherwin Member

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    I'm hearing a lot of different opinions on here and at camera shops. One guy warned me that linear polarizers are stronger and less predictable.

    Essentially, I'm finding it hard to find a slim, linear polariser so i think i'll just have to go with the circular.

    There's this cheap Hoya:
    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/HOYA-55mm-Di...es_CameraLensesFilters_JN&hash=item3f0623884e

    But how about this Marumi?
    http://www.2filter.com/marumi/marumidigitalHG.html

    I am buying two polarizers because I don't want to switch filters every time i switch lens. But my question is, if i buy a more expensive slim filter for my wide angle lens and a less expensive but same brand normal filter for my normal lens, will there be very noticeable differences between the shots taken on each lens?
     
  26. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    What video camera are you using that makes it so you have to worry about vignetting when using a lens designed to cover 35mm still film?

    Also, be aware that if you move the camera (which I am assuming you will be doing, as that is what is done by "anyone half-serious about film," as you say :wink:), the effect of the polarizing filter will change throughout the shot.