Black “Touch-Up” paint for Cameras and other equipment… anything out there?

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by Ira Rush, May 29, 2009.

  1. Ira Rush

    Ira Rush Member

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    If you get a scratch or ding on your car, you can go to an auto supply store and there are 1000’s of shades of touch up paint for your car….

    Any such thing specifically for cameras and equipment… or can I indeed use auto touch up paint since it is made for a metal base?

    Thought I would touch up some of my equipment, which has numerous brassing and lost paint spots...

    ....who knows, maybe I’ll “pimp my Blad” :D

    Seriously, anything out there or could I indeed use automotive paint?


    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Vilk

    Vilk Member

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    i did that a couple of times, when i still cared :smile: very resistant and virtually indistinguishable (this of course would depend on the original finish, location, size and shape of the nick, etc. i'm talking tiny tiny ones)

    unless your original finish is very shiny, you should be ok with the "flat black", don't be tempted by the polished-mirror "glossy" ones. try on a small nick, wait a day; if you don't like it, rubbing alcohol should take care of it

    ps. hands off them brassing, we loves brassing! :smile:
     
  3. Ira Rush

    Ira Rush Member

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    Vilk,

    Thanks for responding...

    I agree, brassing like grey hair makes you look...
    .... distinguished and "professional" :D.... "Now there's a pro, his camera is battle scarred"

    Yes I agree, it's not vanity, but the paint has worn off on my black metal lens hoods/shades and it causes some flare, film back/magazines likewise, paint has come off and those missing paint spots seem to be a bit hotter to the touch in those 1 or 2 spots when I'm out of the studio and in the sun.

    I'll try what you suggest, thanks
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Black nail varnish :D

    works fine for me . . . . . .

    Ian
     
  5. DBP

    DBP Member

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    There is a paint pen made for this purpose, which I think Micro Tools sells. But I usually just use black nail polish.
     
  6. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Have you tried a course sand paper on the lenses? :confused: :tongue:

    and that make a black back look like it is a chrome back.

    Siriusly though, a black back with partially chrome rails does not look all that great. So what is one to do? Buy only chrome backs and bodies and polish off the black paint on the rails for the black backs and bodies.

    Please advise. Interested readers want to know!

    Steve
     
  7. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

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    Hobby shops typically have an assortment of enamels and laquers used on models. They are often available in very small bottles, so not much of an investment to try.

    DaveT
     
  8. Ira Rush

    Ira Rush Member

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    I find "power washing works better" than sand paper :D
     
  9. Monophoto

    Monophoto Member

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    I've used black automotive touch-up paint - the kind in the plastic tube with the brush under the cap. Available in both glossy and matte.
     
  10. Keith Pitman

    Keith Pitman Subscriber

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    For touching up the inside of cameras and film holders, I use a gun retouching pen made by Birchwood Casey. Found where guns are sold, of course.
     
  11. Dave Dawson

    Dave Dawson Member

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    In the past I have used a black perminent marker pen to cover paint loss.....They start a bit matt but after a bit of use blend in nicely

    Cheers Dave
     
  12. picker77

    picker77 Subscriber

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    And while you're there, pick up a can of Birchwood Casey "Gun Scrubber". The best non-residue-leaving instant de-greaser/de-oiler I've ever seen. Puts all other degreasing solvents I've used to shame. Wonderful for de-oiling shutter mechanisms and aperture leaves.
    1. Don't breathe it
    2. Don't use it on plastic.