Black and White in a Color Drum?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by captainwookie, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. captainwookie

    captainwookie Member

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    Ok, this might be an insane question, but does anyone know were there is any information on processing black and white prints in a color drum. I just find that I am far more comfortable with the color workflow than I am with the black and white.
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    You can do it, but you don't get to see the print coming up in the developer, and you have to rinse out the tube every time. It tends to work better with RC paper than with fiber based paper, but you can try and see how your fiber paper of choice holds up in a tube. It can be a handy way of doing occasional big prints in a small darkroom. I have 20x24 and 16x20 tubes for that purpose.
     
  3. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Afternoon, Captainwookie,

    Generally I use a Chromega drum for 4 x 5 film developing, but it also comes in very handy occasionally when I need to knock out a quick contact sheet. As David says, it works fine with RC as long as you don't need to see the print during development. David's comment about large prints is also appropriate. Last summer, I had several dozen 16 x 20's (RC) to make; I did all of them in a drum because none of them required any manipulation during processing and I didn't have to set up the large trays in my limited room. Use of drums saves on chemicals also.

    Konical
     
  4. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    This is the way I develop my mono prints, both R/C and Fibre. There isn’t a special technique, if you have used a drum for colour work then use the same methods for black & white. The paper manufactures give development and fixing times, which are a good starting point, and which I continue to follow. With regard to the chemicals, use the same quantities as recommended for colour work in your drums. You can use them “One Shot” or as I do follow the top up method, it’s very economical and reliable. David mentioned possible problems with Fibre, I have found single weight paper sometimes collapses away from the drum wall, so I only use the heavier papers.
    The method has many advantages, and few drawbacks.
     
  5. captainwookie

    captainwookie Member

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    Thanks. I’ve been messing around with Ilfochrome for the last two months and got very use to the process. I like the fact that I can just go into the darkroom and turn out a single print without much hassle. I don’t want to give up on try processing, I just like the idea of being able to turn out a single print with a small amount of chemistry and mess. Of course I will have to perfect my exposure test process so that I’m not turning out a lot of bad prints.

    So, I just put the print in the color drum and stick it on my Beseler motor base using the normal times? That sounds easy, I'll have to give it a try soon.

    Thanks!
     
  6. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    That all sounds very reasonable. Considering that prints are usually developed to completion, timing shoudn't be a big problem as long as you give enough time.
     
  7. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    That's a valid point.
    I should have added that I finish the process with a couple of water wash cycles of about 30 secs each.
    Removing the print is easier if, having removed the end cap, you stand the drum on end, fill it with water, and wind the print up a little. This unsticks it from the drum.