Blackening for Wood or Metal

Blackening for Wood or Metal

  1. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Christopher Walrath submitted a new resource:

    Blackening for Wood or Metal - Blackening for Wood or Metal

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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 6, 2016
  2. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Thanks for posting.. I love these archaic formulas. I believe many modern analoggers problem's solutions (that's a mouthful) are found in old books by Wall and the like.
     
  3. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    Less archaic formula, but what I started using on the inside of ULF film holders, on any surface that might reflect light. Sharpie Permanent Marker. The idea came from an article written by Michael Mutmansky for View Camera magazine. The article compared available 7x17 wooden film holders. The purpose of using the marker was to improve the film holder's ability to keep out light.

    John Powers
     
  4. Hexavalent

    Hexavalent Subscriber

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    I will recommend this formula to all my competitors :smile:
     
  5. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    I use a black sharpie myself when making the matchbox pinholes and other minor interior stuff as well.
     
  6. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    Another use I had forgotten. Several years ago three 7x17 framed pictures came back from a group show. The frames were Nielsen black aluminum. The show must have used volunteer labor from prisoners who normally stamped out license plates. Each frame piece had scratches and scrapes. They were a mess and unusable for any future show. I inquired here or the LF Forum and several members suggested magic marker or sharpie pen. I tried and the frames looked almost new again.

    John
     
  7. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

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    Somewhere I've read that toners like sulfide or selenium can blacken brass (as in pinhole plates from shimstock) but my own attempts have been less than satisfactory; maybe I don't have the right ones.
     
  8. spoolman

    spoolman Subscriber

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    I'm into model railroads as well as photography and there is a solution called Hobby Black #'s 1&2.It contains Selenium Dioxide,Nitric Acid and Methyl Alcohol.All you do is immerse the part/parts into this solution and in less than 2 minutes you have a pitch black matte surface that will last quite a long time.It works on nickel,brass,steel,copper etc.You can probably find it at any hobby store that carries model train materials or just model materials.

    Doug
     
  9. LumbisK

    LumbisK Member

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    Gun stores also carry blackening solutions, such as Birchwood Casey Brass Black, that are effective for copper and brass. If you have a stained glass store nearby they also carry black patina solutions that are effective for copper materials. I've used both in making pinhole camera parts from copper. These produce a bonded layer with the surface but the layer can still be affected by scratches, etc.

    Ken
     
  10. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    To turn oak black,take some really rusty nails and other steel pieces and soak them in white distilled vinegar for a couple of days, then wipe on the wood. Gives oak a nice ebony look. Fuming white oak with amonia will also turn it a beautiful color(not black) its what the Stickley workshops used to color oak furniture. Fuming with amonia will even color varnished oak. I'll have to find my book on chemical staining for more examples.
     
  11. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Good input all.