Bleach then Tone or Tone then Bleach?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by philldresser, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. philldresser

    philldresser Subscriber

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    A quick question :

    I have a print which needs a few highlights lifting to give it a bit of sparkle, and I also want to Selenium tone it. Which do I do first so as to not leave any bleaching/toning marks, tone or bleach?

    It is printed on a Kentmere Fibre base paper.

    Phill
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2005
  2. Leon

    Leon Member

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    If I'm bleaching to lift highlights and toning in selenium, I use the selenium 1st - but make sure the selenium doesnt get to the hightlight tones, as you wont be able to bleach them then. The selenium will "fix" the image against the action of the bleach. I think it's called "drag-bleaching" ?. BArry Thornton describes it in one of the chapters in Edge of Darkness.

    good luck with it phill
     
  3. Les McLean

    Les McLean Subscriber

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    If there is enough density in the mid tones and shadows I'd suggest that you mix a very weak solution of potassium ferricyanide and place the whole print in it. As a starting point try a dilution of 1 part bleach stock solution to 50 parts water and test it on an old print of similar tonality. This will bleach the highlights and should have little or no effect on the darker values. In the good old days printers regularly slightly over printed the highlights and bleached them back to the required density.

    Selenium tone after bleaching.
     
  4. lee

    lee Member

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    "n the good old days printers regularly slightly over printed the highlights and bleached them back to the required density"

    Jay Dusard is a master of this.

    lee\c
     
  5. philldresser

    philldresser Subscriber

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    Thanks to all

    Les
    The print has 'a lot' of density and I have read the 'whole print' scenario in your book so I am keen to give it a try. Bleach first, tone after.

    Phill
     
  6. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    Phill
    I have always been under the impression that if you bleach first and then Selenium, you *MUST* refix the print before adding the selenium.
    This would not be the case with sepia but for sure with Selenium
    Guys am I correct in thinking this???
     
  7. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    selenium contains fixer, so there is no need
     
  8. Jim Chinn

    Jim Chinn Member

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    Ralph Stiener also used this method to get the sparkling highlights in his work with clouds.

    If you do bleach the whole print, make sure you use a tray next size bigger then the print. Any movement of the solution at the corners of the tray will increase the bleaching action in the corners of the print.

    .
     
  9. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    It is not unusual for toned prints to bevelop spots if belached afterwards.