Bleaching and redevelopment of negative

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by mark, Jan 10, 2005.

  1. mark

    mark Member

    Messages:
    5,264
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    I have seen this recommended before, and someone just suggested it in the gallery section, as a way to increase contrast. Is this really the case and if so how do you do it?
     
  2. Silverpixels5

    Silverpixels5 Member

    Messages:
    594
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2003
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Its talked about in this thread for sure: http://www.apug.org/forums/showthread.php?t=5950&highlight=thin+negative

    I'll also be trying this technique tonight on a roll of 135 film. If i'm not mistaken, you can bleach and redevelop in a staining dev in order to increase contrast via the stain. The process can be repeated to build contrast. I"ll know for sure tonight.
     
  3. mark

    mark Member

    Messages:
    5,264
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    If I already have stained negatives will it work? I reread the thread and I am not sure this was covered, if it was I am too dense to figure it out. Thanks for the thread by the way.
     
  4. Silverpixels5

    Silverpixels5 Member

    Messages:
    594
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2003
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I havn't done it myself yet, but I would imagine that it should work if your negative is already stained since they say that you can repeat the process. Its the stain thats gaining density, not the actual silver. There are other intensification processes that will increase silver density, and I plan to try that if I don't get enough from building the stain.
     
  5. Michael Mutmansky

    Michael Mutmansky Member

    Messages:
    345
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    Mark,

    It will work with a stained negative, but you need to be careful of the B+F stain getting out of hand. If the negative is for silver printing, you probably won't have any problem, but if the neg is for an alternative process, the increased B+F may make printing times verrrrrrrry looooooong.


    ---Michael
     
  6. gainer

    gainer Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,725
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2002
    The other problem that might occur with repeated redevelopment in staining developers is stressing of the emulsion and cracks that show in prints. It will probably take more than 2 treatments, though.
     
  7. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

    Messages:
    3,242
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Location:
    Milwaukee, W
    Shooter:
    35mm
    It works easily

    It works like a charm. It is very easy to do.
     
  8. MurrayMinchin

    MurrayMinchin Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    4,196
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Location:
    North Coast,
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Hi Mark,

    There was a really good description of this process on Barry Thornton's site - which is now expired. Was anybody out there smart enough to print it out? If you did, could you give us all a detailed descrition? It does sound like you can breath new life into thinnish negatives this way. Never tried it though.

    Murray
     
  9. mark

    mark Member

    Messages:
    5,264
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    There was a hell of a lot of useful information on that site.
     
  10. mark

    mark Member

    Messages:
    5,264
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    That is the direction I was heading. I was hoping to punch up the contrast for POP printing. SO basically the amount od stain is increasing with each redevelopment. RIght? How does this help contrast?

    Long exposures, here in the Southwest are not really a problem. Even this winter my longest time under the sun was 12 minutes. If you folks in California would stop sending clouds this way I could print more.
     
  11. Silverpixels5

    Silverpixels5 Member

    Messages:
    594
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2003
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I may be wrong, but I think it helps contrast by proportionally building stain. So I would think more stain on the parts of the negative that are exposed more would make those mid to high zone levels move up a bit. I tried this procedure last night and it worked really well. The developer I used was pyrocat HD. While it did help my negatives a lot, it still wasn't enough, seeing as how they were greatly underdeveloped to begin with. Next I plan to run the roll through In-5 to increase the silver density. Hopefully this will solve my problems.
     
  12. mark

    mark Member

    Messages:
    5,264
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    What did you bleach with?
     
  13. gainer

    gainer Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,725
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2002
    Next time try increasing the silver density first and then do the BRD thing. Of course, you can still BRD one more time on top of the In-5 if need be.
     
  14. Silverpixels5

    Silverpixels5 Member

    Messages:
    594
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2003
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    a teaspoon of table salt and a teaspoon of potassium ferricyanide in a pint of water.
     
  15. gainer

    gainer Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,725
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2002
    For redevelopment, you need a bleach like that used for sulfide sepia toning. Proportions are not critical. A spoonful of potassium bromide and a spoonful of Potassium ferricynide in a liter of water will do the trick. Some recipes add carbonate.
     
  16. mark

    mark Member

    Messages:
    5,264
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    Thanks.