Bostick-Sullivan: contact printing frames question

Discussion in 'Contact Printing' started by Sanjay Sen, Dec 9, 2007.

  1. Sanjay Sen

    Sanjay Sen Member

    Messages:
    1,249
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I was looking at the Bostick-Sullivan contact printing frames, and noticed that the 8x10 frame has an image exposure area of 9x11. So, how do you folks use these frames for 8x10? Do you cut down 11x14 paper to fit in the frame, or do you use spacers to print on 8x10 paper? I do not know of any paper that comes in the 9x11 size, hence the question.

    Thanks in advance.


    Best wishes,
    Sanjay
     
  2. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,521
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    you just put the paper and the negative in the frame - it doesn't have to be square to the frame. All that matters is the frame produces tight even registration across the entire negative/paper contact.
     
  3. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    7,076
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Location:
    Basin and Range Province
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    As Scott said, you just center the paper and negative together. The reason they are over size is to allow one frame to serve for 8x10, and 8.5x11, primarily for alt process.
     
  4. Shawn Dougherty

    Shawn Dougherty Member

    Messages:
    4,184
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    This is the frame I use, usually 8x10 frames crop out a little of the image area. This way you get the full picture and can trim or not to your specifications. Just line up the 8x10 film and paper and load it up. It has worked perfectly for me. Best. Shawn
     
  5. Sanjay Sen

    Sanjay Sen Member

    Messages:
    1,249
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks, guys, for the prompt and helpful answers.


    Best wishes,
    Sanjay
     
  6. Alex Hawley

    Alex Hawley Member

    Messages:
    2,894
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2003
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    The extra inch in each direction also greatly helps getting the paper and negative in and out of the frame.
     
  7. Sanjay Sen

    Sanjay Sen Member

    Messages:
    1,249
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    ... and that is the problem I have now: I'm using an 8x10 frame to print 8x10 negs, and it's a little irritating to get the paper (and negative) out.
     
  8. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

    Messages:
    5,346
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2006
    Location:
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    When contacting 8x10 negatives, I would suggest going for the next size up (12x15). Then you can contact onto 11x4 paper if you wish, or eventually use it for alt processes (generally one wants a good amount of border for those.)

    I just think in the long run, buying a larger frame will save you money -- you won't have to buy a larger frame in the future, and the larger frame in handy to use for 8x10.

    Vaughn
     
  9. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,521
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have the Bostick & Sullivan frame for 11x14, and I use it for 8x10 and 11x14 paper. It is one of the best modern frames out there, far superior to the Photographers Formulary frames. I also have a handful of antique frames, which I use because I got them essentially for free, and in sizes that I can't afford modern ones for (12x20, 14x17). In any case, it's a terrific frame. Get it and you won't regret it, but as Vaughn said, go one size up from whatever you think will be your largest maximum print size. That way, when the addiction catches you and you get an even bigger camera, you can still print without buying another frame! :D
     
  10. Sanjay Sen

    Sanjay Sen Member

    Messages:
    1,249
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Vaughn and Scott,

    I initially went to the Bostick-Sullivan website to look at the 11x14 frame, and that is when I realized that the image exposure areas are actually larger than the frame size. You are right, getting the bigger frame makes more sense. Plus they also have a 10% off sale until Jan 1, 2008.

    As far as the addiction is concerned, I think it's already too late! After I started using the 8x10 more (didn't have a backpack initially), I get the feeling that 4x5 is too small! :D


    Best,
    Sanjay
     
  11. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,521
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    just you wait until you see a print from an 11x14 neg :smile: or even worse, a 14x17.... you'll find yourself taking out an equity loan on your car :D
     
  12. jgjbowen

    jgjbowen Member

    Messages:
    879
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2003
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I too have a B&S 8x10 frame. It is wonderful to work with.
     
  13. michael9793

    michael9793 Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2003
    Location:
    Fort Myers,
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    I have a Zone VI contact frame that is 8x10 and it is a pain. I think I will use my 11x14 frame like Scott said.

    mike andersen
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. Sanjay Sen

    Sanjay Sen Member

    Messages:
    1,249
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Before I stumbled upon APUG, I was shooting a Canon EOS Rebel & a Nikon FM-10. Then it was the F3, then the Bronica SQ-A, then the Zone VI 4x5, and finally the Wehman. I think I should stop coming here, or soon I will be taking mass transit to work! :D
     
  16. Jim Fitzgerald

    Jim Fitzgerald Member

    Messages:
    1,798
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2005
    Location:
    Ventura, Ca
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    Me too! I started with a Canon F-1 and now I just finished building an 8x20. I'm working on the 11x14 now and that will be it!!! Well, i did see Hugo's 20x24 Chamonix and Sandy's 20x24 that Richard Ritter built. Hum............. No, I have to stop coming here also! Forgot to add a vacuum frame is nice. Mine will cover all the way to 17"x23". Guess 16x20 is as big as I can go.

    Jim
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 9, 2007
  17. michael9793

    michael9793 Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2003
    Location:
    Fort Myers,
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    yea we keep growing but hasn't it been a good trip. I started with a nikon and now i have 1-4x5,1-5x7,2-8x10,1-8x20,1 hassey with 5 lens, in debt to my ears, amd memories=priceless

    mike
     
  18. Les

    Les Subscriber

    Messages:
    47
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    centering/aligning contact negs

    Does anyone have any good methods for contact printing e.g. a 5x7 negative on an 8x10 or 11x14 piece of printing paper? I would like to center the image left to right and either center top to bottom or leave an extra bit more room at the bottom for title or signature without doing a bunch of trimming after processing.
    Thanks,
    Les
     
  19. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,521
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I just eyeball the placement with the negative, mark the corners with pencil, then coat to the corner markings. When the paper is dry enough to print, I use the pencil marks to line up the negative again, sandwich in the frame, and expose away.
     
  20. donbga

    donbga Member

    Messages:
    2,084
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    Shooter:
    Large Format Pan
    Cut an opaque mask with the outside dimensions the same saize as the paper and the size of the opening centered in the mask. Place the negative in the opening and print.

    That's one way to do it.
     
  21. donbga

    donbga Member

    Messages:
    2,084
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    Shooter:
    Large Format Pan
    All of the B&S frames have an extra inch in each dimension.
     
  22. Sanjay Sen

    Sanjay Sen Member

    Messages:
    1,249
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Like Don says...: How to Make a Centering Guide.
     
  23. Les

    Les Subscriber

    Messages:
    47
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    When contact printing in a Bostick-Sullivan frame using e.g. a 5x7 negative on 8x10 or 11x14 paper, what is the best way to obtain a white border with clean sharp corners?
    Les
     
  24. donbga

    donbga Member

    Messages:
    2,084
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    Shooter:
    Large Format Pan
    You can cut a ruby-lith mask. Tape the neg. on top of the ruby lith with red masking tape. This will prevent light piping. and create a sharp edge with clean white borders.

    The ruby lith isn't infallable though. If you have long exposure times the ruby-lith will leak UV light and cause the the coating to get enough exposure to create a dingy looking border.

    I also tape the paper with painters tape to restrict the coated area to a minimum.

    Hope this helps,
     
  25. Les

    Les Subscriber

    Messages:
    47
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Thanks Don,
    I appreciate the help.
    Les
     
  26. Mark Burley

    Mark Burley Member

    Messages:
    659
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2007
    Location:
    Toddington,
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Masking film version

    I cut a semi-adhesive masking film, lay it down on the paper (if self-coating) then coat using the film as a mask. This will give a perfect edge. I have also used Ruby Lith on pre-sensitized paper (not as good though).

    I think I read somewhere that you can create your own masks with ruby Lith and acetate. As in create a series of masks to suit you. (The print industry has been doing this for years). Providing the Ruby is on the bottom - as the contact layer I believe it works. I have to say I have not tried it yet though.

    I use a commercial printing plate contact frame (with a vacuum) so this gives me up to over sized A3 as an image area.

    The previous posts have more than covered your original question though.

    Mark. :smile: