Bromoil

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by ronlamarsh, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. ronlamarsh

    ronlamarsh Member

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    I read recently of the technique of creating a print using the bromoil process but using a press on the inked matrix instead of the brush technique. Has anyone tried this? And more importantly if you have is it possible to use a "hand barren" instead of a standard press as the cost of a good press is rather astronomical.
     
  2. Fourtoes

    Fourtoes Member

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    I think the press is used for Bromoil transfer printing. I've just started looking into Bromoil printing, would love to give it a go. Have you looked on alternativephotography.com
     
  3. ronlamarsh

    ronlamarsh Member

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    Looked there but no information on bromoil transfer.
     
  4. Travis Nunn

    Travis Nunn Member

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    Take a look at Gene Laughter's gallery here on APUG...
     
  5. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I have looked at Gene Laughter's gallery and it is excellent. I have looked at Tarvis Nunn's work which is also good!

    Jeff
     
  6. Perry Way

    Perry Way Member

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    The cost of a good etching presses makes this idea cost prohibitive to many. If you examine Gene's work and the work of many other bromoilists, you may find that bromoil prints give you what you're looking for. For example.. you may only transfer the ink while the ink is still wet. What if you're not done with your work but you expected to transfer? Essentially it's a reversed negative to get a transfer right side up, not backwards. With a print, you can let it dry, and return to it days, weeks later. In fact sometimes that kind of work allows a creative process with overlaying colors that would not be possible if it was all one soupy mess of stacked pigments and grease.