Bromophen turning pink?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by hoffy, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. hoffy

    hoffy Member

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    OK, Hopefully this will be a quicky. I mixed up a batch of Bromophen two and a half weeks ago. While the majority went into brimmed full PET bottles, about a litre went into a half full PET bottle, which I used a portion of two weeks ago. I have now noticed the remainder in the half full bottle has a very distinct pink hue to it. I know that Ilford claim that it will be OK for two months and I do plan to use the remainder tonight, I just want to know if this is the early signs of it starting to oxidise?

    Cheers
     
  2. paul_c5x4

    paul_c5x4 Subscriber

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    Had a batch of D76 (as I recall) that was pink on mixing - Used it as normal without any discernible ill effects.
     
  3. hoffy

    hoffy Member

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    Yes, I have to admit that I am not overly concerned, more to the point I am curious in what's happening, that's all!
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    You will get a slight colour change as a developer oxidises slowly but most PQ developers will work fine even when they've turned a dark straw colour.

    Ian
     
  5. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Mason, "Photographic Processing Chemistry" contains a long discussion of the oxidation of Phenidone. He states that mild oxidation in an alkaline solution yields a pink colored compound.