Brown Dektol

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by ParkerSmithPhoto, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. ParkerSmithPhoto

    ParkerSmithPhoto Member

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    After mixing fresh Dektol about a week ago, I filled four one liter brown plastic bottles to the top for storage. As of yesterday, it had all turned brown, like dark brown, but still seemed to work okay.

    So, obviously, the brown plastic bottles are no good for Dektol storage. Will they be usable for other stuff or should I just throw them in the trash? How can you tell what plastic is safe for photo chemistry?

    All of my other bottles are super duper brown glass that I snagged from the trash at a state environmental lab. Might have to hit the dumpster again!
     
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  2. mike c

    mike c Subscriber

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    If the bottles are fulled to the top and sealed good the developer should last longer than that I'd think. Dektol does have a Lt brown color to it after mixed, should be ok to use try it.
    Glass is better to keep oxygen out but I've always used plastic myself.
    Mike
     
  3. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    What was in your possibly contaminated bottles before?

    That's the whole problem with brown glass bottles as well, you can not see some residue in the bottles. Is was, is and always will be a problem with darkroom chemical storage. I hated them 40+ years ago at school and university for just that problem.

    Dektol, D76 and Kodak RA4 paper developer keep for many months is PETE plastic soda bottles. They are clear, cleanable, inexpensive and virtually unbreakable.
     
  4. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    Never had this problem -- even with several weeks (to months) with Dektol in plastic bottles.

    I suppose if one vigorously stirs the powder into the water and introduces lots of oxygen into the mix before one caps the bottle, some extra oxidation might happen.
     
  5. ParkerSmithPhoto

    ParkerSmithPhoto Member

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    I think you may have solved the mystery. The Dektol didn't seem to want to dissolve, so I gave it a good vigorous shaking before I poured it into the smaller bottles. From now on, I will stir!
     
  6. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    I've used Dektol from stock solutions that were the color of weak coffee, and it was fine. Brown isn't the end of the world, but it should be translucent.
    Shaking it to mix isn't good, nor is stiring so vigorously that you pull air in.
    You may want to make a test print from a negative you know well, that you have a good print from for comparison.
    But if the image emergence time is good and you're getting good blacks, the developer is fine.
     
  7. mike c

    mike c Subscriber

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    The water temp. that Kodak recommends for mixing is important.

    Mike