Bulk Loading

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Flotsam, Sep 26, 2004.

  1. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    I did it year ago but my memory is dim.
    How many 36 exp rolls do you realistically get out of a hundred foot roll?
     
  2. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    I think you get around 25 rolls. Using bulk is more for the flexability of winding shorter and custom rolls that way your exposures are basically the same situation and developement, consistant for all the shots on that roll. Otherwise you'll wind up with blocked up highs and others too flat or thin on the same roll.

    I make my rolls around 15 or so frames and blow the entire roll on one subject.
     
  3. harveyje

    harveyje Subscriber

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    I used to try to do 35 exposure rolls so they would fit file pages better (7 strips of 5 frames each) and would get 18-20 rolls per 100 foot long roll.
     
  4. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    18-20 seems about right to me, too.
     
  5. Louis Nargi

    Louis Nargi Member

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    IT should also be less expensive, at the veary least 1/3. with the prices I'v at JandC and others I may half to take another look.
     
  6. Dean Williams

    Dean Williams Member

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    You should get 18 rolls at 36 exp each. I do, at least. Depends, too on how long you make your leaders, and how much film at the end of each roll is light struck. Some bulk loaders have a shorter distance from the feed out opening to the cassette take-up crank opening, so the end of the film, where it is taped to the spool could have from 1 1/2 to 3 frames exposed to light, depending upon your loader.
     
  7. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    I get between 20 and 25 rolls of varying lenghts. Most of them are around 30-32 exp but sometime I need 15 or even 12.

    If you were to made all 35 exps you may get 20
     
  8. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    As I remember, I also was winding 35 frame rolls for the same reason as John.
    The number "19" sticks in my mind, which fits right in with the experience of others here.
    Thanks everybody.
     
  9. gma

    gma Member

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    36 exp requires 54" plus leader and taped end. An 8" leader and end combined will make the total length 62". 100 ft = 1200". You should get 19 rolls if you are careful not to waste too much everytime you open the film loader. If I were bulk loading today I would make 12 exp rolls for the same reason as stated by others. I rarely use all 36 exp at one time. I cut the film in the camera in the darkroom and make a new tongue for the remaining unexposed film after I get the exposed film in the reel. It is a bother, but the films I buy from J&C are available as 36 exp only.

    I have given up on bulk loading because reusing cartridges increases the chance of scratching film. IMO the time and effort required to make the exposures is worth a lot more than the small amount saved by bulk loading. The only reason I would bulk load today is if I found an unusual film available in bulk only.
     
  10. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    I've always ignored bulk loading for the same reasons. But with future supplies of a chosen film possibly in jeopardy, bulk loading could be another way to stock up rather than lots of little boxes. Also shooting shorter rolls would mean less wastage as I write off any unexposed frames if I finish shooting before the roll is used. Might be worth considering again.
     
  11. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    I'm concerned about that too. I don't remember having huge problems with it but back in those days, scratches seemed commonplace even with factory film. My technique must have really sucked. I went through so much nose grease that I could have used a second nose.

    How about winding the film onto the spool in the loader and then going dark to slip on the cassette? That way the film doesn't have to go through the felt (until it's in the camera) and it doesn't add too much inconvenience if you have a place where you load holders anyway.
     
  12. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I've never had a problem with scratched film due to bulk loading. I usually use the cartridges about three or four times at most, and I have an Alden 74 bulk loader that I think I've had for about 20 years.
     
  13. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Evening,

    I have a Watson bulk loader which I use only occasionally since I don't shoot a lot of 35mm. I'll second the idea of aiming for 35 exposure rolls because of the ease of contacting. Eighteen or nineteen full cartridges per 100 feet is about right. I can't recall ever having a problem with scratches, even though I have sometimes used the cartridges more times than is usually thought advisable.

    Konical
     
  14. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    Here's a better question. Buying cassettes eats up the savings of bulk loading. I remember when Ilford film cassettes had pop-off caps and could be re-used with a bulk loader.
    What films come in reusable cassettes these days?


    My first "real" camera was an Exacta VX1000. which among it's novel features, allowed you to put a film cassette in the takeup position. If you wanted to process a partial roll, you could just advance the film into the takup cassette, pull down a built-in, internal cutter blade and open the back. That was a wonderful, versatile camera for a young photographer at the beginning of a long road, anxious to experiment and learn.
     
  15. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I think the 70mm Combat Graphic rangefinder also has that internal knife feature.

    I remember those old Ilford snap-cap cartridges. I don't know of any manufacturers that still use them. Maybe some of the East Europeans or someplace like Freestyle, which sells house-brand film loaded from bulk rolls.
     
  16. rjr

    rjr Member

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    The soviet Start SLR had an internal knife, too.

    David,

    Efke uses reloadable cassettes. I don´t know of Foma or Forte, I always used either type 120 or bulk film from Foma. Lucky supposedly comes in snap-caps, too.

    I usually recycle normal crimped cassettes (Kodak, Fuji, Agfa, Ilford) - when processing them myself I leave out the last frame and cut off accordingly. The bulk film is taped on that small tongue still protuding out of the cassette.

    Works fine with me - never had any scratches from bulk loading in3 years now. :smile:

    The best cassettes I use are made my AP in Spain and they have the bayonett snap cap ORWO used to make - I believe the AP derive from those classic ORWO plastic cassettes.
     
  17. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    I'm not familiar with the Start but the Exacta was made it Soviet occupied Germany.

    I think that Efke and JandC cassettes have pop off caps. I always try to pop new films before prying. It's an old habit.
     
  18. bjorke

    bjorke Member

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    I have two Watsons which are loaded with TMax 100 and Tri-X. I typicallyu get 18 or 19 rolls. I count clicks until it hits 40. I label ALL my cassettes and keep track of which ones are used for which roll as they're shot -- if there is a light leak (occasional) or scratch (very rare) on the developed negs, the cassette is discarded. I have used these loaders for years without a problem or a loader-attributable scratch.
     
  19. jcausey

    jcausey Member

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    I'm about to take the bulk-loading plunge; can anyone recommend a particular brand/type/source of 35mm cassette/cartridge? I'd prefer to order from an APUG sponsor if possible.
     
  20. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    When I was doing it my favorite type was the plastic ones with the screw on end. They can be washed and not rust. Easy to open but will stay shut without problems.
     
  21. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Evening, Jcausey,

    Among my purchases today at a St. Louis photo store was a handful of empty cassettes. The brand name is Kalt, and the label indicates Spanish manufacture. I've used the same brand before and found the cassettes to be sturdy and reliable. They cost 79¢ each. The best bargain is still to reuse some old Ilford cassettes.

    Konical
     
  22. rjr

    rjr Member

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    Konical, that sounds very much like AP - I use them, too, some of them in their 10th reloading and they are recommendable.

    http://www.photo-plastic.es/

    They are said to be _very_ close to the old ORWO plastic cartridges, the bajonett cap is a simple and sturdy thing.

    some people have trouble with the metal type - sometimes the enamel is loose and it will scratch the film. :smile:
     
  23. bjorke

    bjorke Member

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    BTW, both B&H and Adorama are backordered on Fuji bulk film, B&H is out of "USAW" Tri-X and Ilford... had to fall back on "plan B" and buy a spool of HP5 yesterday (not dissing HP5, but I usually use Tri-X and like to limit technical variables)