Burke and James 8X10

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by James Bleifus, Sep 8, 2004.

  1. James Bleifus

    James Bleifus Member

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    I'm thinking about getting an 8X10 for 4X10 panoramic shots. One of the cameras that has caught my eye is the Burke and James which seems very affordable. Can anyone pass on their experiences? I need something rugged, reliable and affordable.

    Cheers,

    James
     
  2. PJC

    PJC Member

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    Rugged, reliable and affordable that's a B&J; they're built like a tank. They weigh in at about 13 lbs, but if the weight isn't a consideration it offers tremendous stability. I used an 8x10 B&J for years until I wanted something lighter and then picked up a Canham. I still have the B&J if you're interested.

    Regards, Pete
     
  3. wfwhitaker

    wfwhitaker Member

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    I second the motion. Use the money you save for film and paper.
     
  4. John Kasaian

    John Kasaian Member

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    Straightforeward cameras. I had an 11x14. I don't know about the 8x10 but mine had bellows that went from here to there and back again. The only thing I didn't like were the focusing knobs that really protruded when the camera was folded, and the seperate extension rail. Not big deals really. For the money they're very good deals. I graduated to a Deardorff though. The self casing design works better for me in the field---no extension rails to misplace and no knobs way out there to foul on the foliage. Personal preference. If rugged reliable and affordable is what you want, a B&J is certainly that.
     
  5. roteague

    roteague Member

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    I know who Burke and Wills is (our Aussie members will know this one). Does that count?
     
  6. lee

    lee Member

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    I have a B&J 8x10 that is big and heavy and wobbly. The back falls off sometimes when I am inserting or removing the film holders. I always allow the camera to settle down from the shakes before I pull the trigger. I like the negs it makes. I think I will keep it for now.

    lee\c
     
  7. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    I use an old B&J which weighs 17# with the lens (300mm Symmar-S). It is rugged, stable and a pain in the a$$ to lug around. It is an excellent value, works well, sets up easily and does a good job.

    I made a reducing back with an old Graflok back and a used parts back. Great combination for long shots with the 300mm lens, very sharp, and wonderful to focus in 8x10 format. The original glass is still in place, but it is fairly coarse when compared to a newer typical 4x5 ground glass.

    Biggest down-side is the weight and bulk. Unless you are willing to do a bit of lifting and walking with this beast, you won't be going very far from the car to shoot. I got an old Fujinon aluminum clad video lens trunk which holds camera, film holders, lens shade, dark cloth, meter and other odds and ends too numerous to name. Add the Bogen 3051 with 3047 head (another 17#) and you have a chiropractor's dream come true.

    Too bad it takes such nice pictures!
     
  8. James Bleifus

    James Bleifus Member

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    Thanks everyone. You've given me a lot of great information.

    Cheers.