Burn that backpack

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Deniz, Aug 13, 2004.

  1. Deniz

    Deniz Member

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    Me and my in-pain spine decided to stop hauling around my 8x10 camera so we looked for some alternative ways to accomplish this task.

    I was out photographing with my friend Andrew O'Neill last week and my 8x10 tachihara+6 holders+ann the extras+my massive surveyors tripod felt heavier and heavier by everyminute i spent walking. At the end of the day i sat on the sidewalk and asked god to take me..

    So i went on a quest to carry all that equipment around.. the answer started in cnd tire and the california innovations cooler that holds my 8x10 tachihara+6holders+darkcloth perfect. Then i went in to my shed and dug out an old granny cart and cleaned it up and painted it. the result is in the pictures. My tripod mounts on it perfect and my back is laughing.
    I also put in my old shoulder bag that carries my 2 lenses + filters+light meter and some other extras. the front hand bag has my spare film and storage film box.i made a baseplate for the cart from cardboard and covered it with red fabric. and i also have my fuji film sponsored cushion.

    I will never backpack with this gear unless i really have to.

    have a nice day all
     

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  2. Francesco

    Francesco Member

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    What do you do if you need to haul it up a rock face? I love your idea but I find it limited to flat or nearly flat locations. Most of my nature shots are deep in the forest where there is no laid out path but uneven terrain OR where I need to do some rock climbing. Eventually one needs to look into a four-wheel drive version of this. On the other hand, yours spine is more important than any ground breaking photo op.
     
  3. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    I carry my entire 8x10 kit in (and attached to) a Kelty internal frame back pack. The entire kit with camera, accessories, 3 lenses, 4 film holders and my tripod/ballhead, weighs 23 pounds. A lighter option is one film holder, one lens, a box of film and my changing bag. In either case, everything but the tripod/ballhead fits inside the pack.

    My back is happy. If I need to do any rock climbing, I take the pack off and haul it up with a rope.
     
  4. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    Pull-type golf cart.
    juan
     
  5. Deniz

    Deniz Member

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    I forgot to tell that my back is injured pretty bad. Been going to the chiroproctor regularly. so backpacking with my 30lbs+ gear is not a pleasent experience for me.
    Appearently i was born with an incomplete vertabrea so it causes way too much stress on my back muscles and nerves.
    So as i said unless i have to backpack to get to the location i will drag my granny cart along..
     
  6. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    Deniz, if you are having back trouble at such an early age, then stop doing the heavy lifting and packing. You're too young to have this type of problem! Do the exercises you need to strengthen the muscles around the area which is causing you trouble. Keep active, but give it a rest until things get better. The cart looks like a great idea and will help your shooting. You can't work on a shot if you are hurting badly. Your body is a lot tougher than you can imagine, but you have to keep it running well if you want to take good pictures.
     
  7. Deniz

    Deniz Member

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    thanks Tim.
    I am 21 and I've been hiking and camping with heavy gear since i was 9. at 10 i hiked up one of the toughest mountains in Turkey with my dad. and since 16 i've been professionally competing in BMX-freestyle championships. I know i did put my body through alot with all the sports i've bben doing. chiropractor visits seemed to help a bit but last month i was wakeboarding and the back pain was just un bearable.I am trying to do my stretches and Tai-chi regularly to keep my body and mind in shape.

    I am excited about this Cart idea.. I can backpack my 4x5 no problem but 8x10 is just too heavy for my back(maybe if i had a great backpack it wouldnt be so bad.)

    It's way too hot here right now.. I am staying under the AC all day...

    cheers
     
  8. BWGirl

    BWGirl Member

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    Hey, I like the cart! But you need to call those people on that TV show "Pimp my Ride" to see if they can soup it up a wee bit for you! Maybe some off-road tires and mag wheels. A little gas shock suspension. Some flames... :D
    Jeanette
     
  9. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Deniz, it sounds like we have a similar back problem (spondylolisthesis in my case). You should be sure that the backpack you use isn't putting the weight on your shoulders. The weight should rest on your hips using a well-adjusted waist strap, ideally with a lumbar support, and the shoulder straps should just keep the pack upright. A sternum strap also can help. A pack like the Kelty pack or Jansport external frame pack or a modern internal frame pack (Lowe and others) will do this.
     
  10. John McCallum

    John McCallum Member

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    Good on ya Deniz. Take care of that back, you only get one, and it's gotta last a while yet. Also, don't know about you but I find that I take better photos if I'm relaxed (and not in excruciating pain).
    A few yrs ago I was pretty active like yourself and I hated taking the time to do the recommended back exercises. But actually they do work.

    Also David's was v good advice.

    Like the cart. Get some off road rubber on those puppies and you're cooking :D .
     
  11. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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  12. Robert Kennedy

    Robert Kennedy Member

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    Here is a solution I have used. Albeit with a larger dog.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Deniz

    Deniz Member

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    Hey robert, i do have a 4 year old German Shepard..but the damn thing wouldn't stop jumping around :smile:

    That Sherpa Cart looks very nice but for $200 i would have to spend on it i could buy whole lot of film.. :smile:
     
  14. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    Deniz, look at that address on the Sherpa Cart! Let me know if a "gift" is in order on this one. Quido.
     
  15. Tom Stanworth

    Tom Stanworth Member

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    I hope to condition my young boys into thinking that following their old man around carrying his kit is a privalege. They are tiny and not out of nappies yet, so I have plenty of time to work on them......Their fitness regime has already started....they won't even know the 8x10 is there! They're gonna feel so lucky!
     
  16. Deniz

    Deniz Member

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    haha Tim, I can't thank you enough for your help.. How are you liking the film?
    I was hanging out with Andrew O'neill here he told me that you sent him a 4x5 azo sample too. very cool
     
  17. David A. James

    David A. James Member

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    Deniz

    Deniz, Francisco makes a good point, a grocery cart is limited. I can offer from experience what does work well over very rough terrain and that is a bicycle trailer (bugger) with a handle bar. Keep your eye out for one that is used with good wheels. Many different models are manufactured, but only those which are the lightest are suitable. 20 inch diameter inflated tires will roll over medium size cobbles and boulders with little effort. If you need to haul up over larger boulders, the rig will remain stable and roll, unlike the grocery cart which offers only its wire face to rock face. See if you can borrow one from a cycling friend. Get a bit of static (non-stretch) climbing rope and a couple of jammers. Go to a climbing shop and they will show you how to use the jammers to haul that cart efficiently over obstructions. Go to an Army surplus store and look for an old aluminum electronic packing case (waterproof). The Navy and Airforce had such cases for all sorts of technical gear. You should be able to find one large enough to accommodate everything except your tripod. Bolt that to the cart and you are in business. Plus, you have something to sit on when you get tired. Just a thought. Regards, David.

     
  18. Deniz

    Deniz Member

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    If i had the funds to buy a bike trailer, i would spend a little more and get a nice lowepro backpack..

    As i said i will backpack with this stuff if i have to(rough terrain and hiking in the forecast) but otherwise i will be pushing/pulling my granny cart to whereever i take my 8x10 to :smile:
     
  19. darinwc

    darinwc Subscriber

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    Deniz, you might also look for a stroller/jogger at a garage sale. They generally have 3 large tires which can handle off-road terrain nicely. The seat for the kid is just right size for a camera pack. And they often have a mesh pocket in the back for water, snacks, whatever.
     
  20. anyte

    anyte Member

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    Taking my 2 year old son out shooting with me can be a bit of a pain sometimes, as he doesn't have the patience to sit with me while I fiddle about with my gear. There is one advantage though. I can stuff all my gear in his stroller, which makes it much easier to haul around. The stroller we have wasn't intended for unpaved paths but I find I can easily tip it and pull it when needed and light enough to pick up the entire thing and haul it over rougher terrain. Granted, I haven't tried hauling it up any real steep terrain but and it's a nightmare job pushing it through uneven terrain if my son gets tired (but it helps keep me in shape).

    I'm waiting for him to get old enough to join me in my love of photography ... so that he of course can help carry some of my gear. :smile:
     
  21. mikewhi

    mikewhi Member

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    Enough about the cart, I want to know why the house is so neat. I mean, you're 21 for goodness sake and apparently an Xtreme sports addict. Aren't you guys supposed to be sloppy? Don't you get dressed in the morning by going thru a pile of clothes in the corner?

    If you want to see a nice cart, you should see the one Oliver Gagliana uses in the video biography on him. Big tires and he hauls around a lot of stuff for an 80 year old guy. Not good offroad, but those days were behing him then. For me, I'm 50+ and I can still pack all that 8x10 stuff and Reis tripod up and down trails. Knock on wood.

    -Mike
     
  22. Deniz

    Deniz Member

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    Lol, Mike.

    I usually go through periods where i keep my room super clean and tidy..that happened to be one of them...
    i do have to dig my clothes out in the morning..