Burton 95, H&W Control recipes?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Murray@uptowngallery, Apr 23, 2008.

  1. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Anyone know where to look at recipes for Burton 95 and H&W Control developers?

    I spent some time on Google, and got no where (old posts telling one to use them or that they were no longer available).

    Thanks

    Murray
     
  2. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    You can find the patents: one for H&W and another for what looks like a rip-off.

    I can't remember the magic words to get them to appear. Keep trying >> fine grain developer phenidone << and such for key words and something should come up.
     
  3. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Thank you.

    I think I PM'ed you a densitometer question. If I didn't, I thought about it!
     
  4. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    H&W

    US patent 3772019

    Now I know who H&W were.

    Didn't find Burton yet, but I have enuff reading for a bit.

    Murray
     
  5. CBG

    CBG Member

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    H&W Control: quoted from: www.frugalphotographer.com/formulary-general.htm

    Solution A:
    Water. . . . . . . . .50 ml
    Sodium sulfite . . . 1 g
    Hydroquinone . . . .0.16 g
    Sodium carbonate .4.6 g
    Phenidone . . . . . . 1.1 g

    Solution B
    Water . . . . . . . . . 50 ml
    Sodium sulfite . . . . 8 g
    Add Solution A to Solution B, then add water to make 132 ml of concentrate.

    ------------
    Burton 195 Film Developer for Kodak Technical Pan
    from: Bjorn Burton http://bjornburton.org

    water (120°F/48°C) . . . 750 ml
    Metol . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 g
    Sodium sulfite (mono) . . .10 g
    Borax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 g
    Boric acid . . . . . . . . . . . 1 g
    Cold water to . . . . . . . . .1 L

    one shot developer.
    Expose at ISO 25
    Develop 6 minutes at 68°F.
    Use plenty of agitation.


    Best,

    C
     
  6. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    The way it was marketed, you'd think H&W Control developer would be something more exotic than that.
     
  7. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    I believe the Burton formula is also listed in "The Darkroom Cookbook" or "Film Dev Cookbook".
     
  8. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Murray, did you also give the `Perfection XR-1´-formula a thought?
     
  9. Murray Kelly

    Murray Kelly Member

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    The Holden and Weichert formula as published (Frugal Photographer) and allegedly used in the Bluefire developer is meant to be used quickly.
    The Carbonate is added to the developing agents and altho it looks like a bath 'A' and 'B' to mix as required nobody would put all that CO3 in with the phenidone and expect it to keep.
    I sugest putting all the sulfite in a bath 'A' and all the carbonate in a bath 'B' if you want it to last any sort of reasonable time and mix those as needed.

    A better solution :smile: might be to disolve the phenidone and HQ as a concentrate in alcohol or glycol and have a premixed sulfite and carbonate solution ready to go - i.e. add enough of the concentrate to the volume needed for your paticular tank. I leave the math to you.
    That way it would last for a very long time.
    I have been using it for microfilms with success. I even add a little ascorbate to 'jolly along' the phenidone, but that's another story.

    Murray
     
  10. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    XR-1, thanks.I'll look.

    Thanks all.
     
  11. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    H&W Control
    This developer, invented by Harold Holden and Arnold Weichert in the late 1960's, was patented in 1973. The patent has expired, and the formula is now in the public domain.
    H&W Control was sold in retail stores for several years, but did not receive widespread distribution. Before being commercialized, it was used extensively by the US military for developing surveillance films, the kinds used by top-secret high-altitude aircraft of the day such as the U2.

    The developer recipe listed below is my TEA version of H&W Control, formulated for multi-year shelf life. This modified H&W Control formula should give you similar sensitometric results to those obtained with commercially packaged Bluefire HR.
    Solution A:
    Triethanolamine 75 ml
    Hydroquinone 0.32 g
    Phenidone 2.2 g
    Triethanolamine to 100 ml


    Solution B
    Water 750 ml
    Sodium sulfite 4.5 g
    Sodium carbonate 2.3 g
    Water to 1 liter

    Add 25 ml Solution A to 250 ml Solution B, then add water to make 1 liter of Working Solution.

    Phenidone and Hydroquinone are soluble in TEA. Warm the Triethanolamine to 80° to 100°F in a water bath. Then mix the chemicals in the order shown, and be sure each is completely dissolved before adding the next.

    Use with Bluefire Police, Agfa and Fuji microfilms, and Kodak Technical Pan. Gives unacceptably flat images on ordinary films.

    Shelf life of solution A is expected to be very long (years).
    Shelf life of solution B is expected to be 2-3 years.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2008
  12. Alan Johnson

    Alan Johnson Subscriber

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    Looks promising,Tom.
    My H&W Control went off after about 6 months.
    Copex Rapid,EI 25, sun/shade, 14 min 68F in H&W Control.
     
  13. Murray Kelly

    Murray Kelly Member

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    I took the BF HR control packet (the smaller one) and disolved the contents in denatured alcohol. Any sulfite there is pretty insignificant and I stir well before drawing off the amount I need with a syringe. I don't believe there is enough there to make any difference, really, but do it anyway. It just disappears into the final mix.

    My separate stocks are still fine a year later. FF label them 'B' for the active ingredients and 'A' for the activator / sulfite powder, IIRC? The opposite to what I'm used to anyway. As I say - it's been a year.

    Murray