BW film with good sky-cloud differentiation

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Eugen Mezei, Jun 13, 2012.

  1. Eugen Mezei

    Eugen Mezei Member

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    Hello!

    Which would be a bw film with good clouds-sky contast without yellow filter. Rich midtone differentiation would also be nice.

    I need such a film for my P&S cameras where I can't mount a filter.
     
  2. R.Gould

    R.Gould Member

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    Try Fomapan 400, often use it without filters and get great clouds,seems to work with or without filters when you get those great cloudscapes
    Richard
     
  3. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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    you can always just hold a filter in front of your lens
     
  4. Michael R 1974

    Michael R 1974 Subscriber

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    TMAX film is balanced slightly different than most other B&W films, similar to using a light yellow filter (like a #6). But the effect is subtle. Better to just attach the filter somehow.
     
  5. Klainmeister

    Klainmeister Member

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    I've been using Foma 100 in the Olympus XA with great results. With my development routine, the 100 acts as if it has a yellow filter while the 400 is less contrasty with excellent midtones. Other than those two, Adox?
     
  6. presspass

    presspass Member

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    Divided developers like Thornton and Stoeckler also help. I've had good results with both and Arista Premium 400 (AKA Tri-X) without a yellow filter.
     
  7. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    APX400 if you can still find some. Very nice separation with no filters at all.
     
  8. Vaughn

    Vaughn Member

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    Another vote for Tmax films
     
  9. Eugen Mezei

    Eugen Mezei Member

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    That's fine to hear. I have some rolls of APX400, one or two will go into the Olympus mju-II (Epic) and the Yashica T3.

    I also want to develop in Stöckler, haven't thought about it as tonality separation. Well... haven't thoght about it at all, but thinking now, you use Stöckler/Thornton for reducind contrast. Would that not mask the clouds?

    T-Max and Tri-X are also here, Foma could be bought easily (in fact it is the only BW film avaible locally) so I will give them a try.
     
  10. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member

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    You can cut a gel filter to size and tape it across the film gate inside the camera. If the camera has an external sensor to determine exposure, you can also tape a piece of filter over it to compensate. Alternately, adjust the ISO setting manually or by putting a DX label on the film cartridge to compensate for filter factor.
     
  11. Chrismat

    Chrismat Subscriber

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    Try Rollei Retro 80s, it has an extended red sensitivity. It's like shooting with a light orange filter without using any filter.
     
  12. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    Delta 400 has similar spectral sensitivity to Fomapan 400, both into far red with a sharp drop off. Only Delta 400 and 3200 have this from Ilford.

    Fomapan 400 has over double the red sensitivity it does than blue sensitivity on the low end, and almost triple the far red sensitivity than blue (Fomapan 400 peaks about 690 and drops off sharply to almost nothing at 700), only 400 has that, 200 does in sheet sizes only iirc. Looks similar to FP4+ but over a longer sensitivity scale.

    Delta 400 is much more even, equal sensitivity across the board, peak is about 670 before dropping off smoother to nothing at 700.
     
  13. David Allen

    David Allen Member

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    When I used to do traditional large format photography with FP4, etc I always used a minus blue filter.

    Since switching (many years ago) to Delta 400 processed in two-bath developer I have not found any need to use filters. This film and developer combination gives great clouds and very good tonal separation.

    If you go to my website, click on the 'Galleries' button and then on Portfolio called 'Berlin Prenzlauer Berg II" and click through to view images 4, 9 & 10 you can see the kind of clouds that the film produces with no filtration and no manipulation at the printing stage (other than a slight burn-in in the direction of the sun because of the difference in density caused by using a wide-angle lens).

    Best,

    David
    www.dsallen.de
     
  14. BobD

    BobD Member

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    Many first generation AF point & shoot cameras have filter mounting threads and are very inexpensive these days. Example: the Nikon L35AF
     
  15. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    The only way to really settle this question is to look at the spectral sensitivity curves for each of the films. However, from my own experience I would say that no BW film really produces a good representation of clouds. Regardless of any claims to panchromatic sensitization, films all have an increased blue sensitivity by their very nature. You really need to use a filter.
     
  16. newcan1

    newcan1 Subscriber

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    I have done this very effectively to use tungsten movie stock in point and shoot cameras, using an 85A orange gel filter.
     
  17. IloveTLRs

    IloveTLRs Member

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