1. Steve Anchell

    Steve Anchell Member

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    Does anyone know anyone processing C-21?
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Rocky Mountain Film Labs does C-22 and claims to be able to handle processes not listed on their website. What films are C-21?
     
  3. Steve Anchell

    Steve Anchell Member

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    It's probably my memory, but as I recall the pre-C-41 color negative process was C-21. Maybe it was C-22. I'll contact Rocky Mountain and set the record straight. Either way, it's probably what I'm looking for.

    Thank you very much
     
  4. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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  5. Steve Anchell

    Steve Anchell Member

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    I know I'm sounding like an idiot, but color negative was never my strong suite. I started photography developing E-3 transparency by hand at 75 degrees and printing Cibachrome.

    As I recall, when I started in photography, and remember, my memory isn't what it used to be, especially for processes I didn't use much, it was C-21 then became C-22 (?) and finally C-41.

    Like I said, I'm going to contact Rocky Mountain (thank you for the link), and find out for certain.
     
  6. Steve Anchell

    Steve Anchell Member

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    FYI, the film in question is Kodacolor X and it says to develop in C-21.

    I contacted Rocky Mountain and they said they had never heard of C-21, only C-22. That proves that I'm older than I remember. Excuse me while I go have a lie down.
     
  7. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Thanks for the update. That's interesting.

    P.S.: I just sent for a 2 year subscription to _Photovision_.
     
  8. b.e.wilson

    b.e.wilson Member

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    My 1974 Kodak Color Dataguide lists C-22 and C-41 only. I wonder, did (does) Kodak have any little-known processes, or processes that lasted only a very sort time, particularly color processes?

    The Guide also lists E-3 and E-4 for color transparencies, and Ektaprint 3 and 300 (froom color negs) and Ektaprint R-5 and RD for prints from slides.

    Of all of these, only C-41 remains.
     
  9. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    I know of one other. One of the issues of Camera and Darkroom had the recipe for "K-14" which I think (don't bet the farm on this) was the process for the latest Kodachrome.
    My! ... A truly involved, complex process. I would not recommend it for "home" use.

    I do have something else - an intact Anscochrome Processing Kit, from the mid '60's. I have fond memories of this ... time has dulled the pain. Eleven little foil packets - mix them all up and comandeer the kitchen sink for a tempering bath. Sixteen processing "steps" - including the reversal exposure (two minutes - three feet from an R2 photoflood lamp - through a transparent film reel..). GALLONS and gallons of washing. The time necessary was something like three and a half hours...
     
  10. Robert

    Robert Member

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    Kodak still offers a webpage on E-4. Including the formulas to brew your own chemicals. So I guess you could say E4 is still out there.
     
  11. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    K-14 is still the process for Kodachrome. Before that was K-12, if I'm not mistaken, for the first generation of Kodachrome.
     
  12. Steve Anchell

    Steve Anchell Member

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    I am mistaken. The process on the roll IS C-22.

    A student contacted me and asked for the C-21 process. I asked her, are you certain it's C-21 and not C-22? She said, it says so right on the roll. Having a faulty memory for color negative (as I stated in the beginning) I took her word for it. This morning she called and said she checked again and that it was C-22!

    I had assumed (you know that word) that she had the film in front of her when she positively stated that it read C-21.

    I apologize for getting everybody worked up over a little known process that never existed.
     
  13. Aggie

    Aggie Member

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    ..
     
  14. Gerald Koch

    Gerald Koch Member

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    There are also the following processes for motion picture films; ECN-2 for color negative, and RVNP and VNF-1 for color reversal.
     
  15. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    Yes, K-14 is the Kodachrome process. It's quite involved (something like 10+ steps, I think) - I'm not even sure if it can be done at home ... (which is to bad, because comemrcial processing cannot be found on hte cheap). There was a K-12, and, I believe, a K-11 process. Kodak only nakes K-14 chemicals, now, though.

    As to process C-22, I've been talking about this on another topic, trying to figure out which (if any) modern developers can be used to process this.

    If you want this film developed, your best bet is probably to do it yourself in B&W chemicals. I've done this (recently) with C-41 films, and they come out useable, but with quite an orange mask and some lack of contrast.