C41 Shock

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by outwest, Feb 28, 2008.

  1. outwest

    outwest Subscriber

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    Just did C41 for the first time and I wish someone had said that the negs are going to look like a disaster until they dry! I was checking chemicals and times and temps to see where I went wrong after I pulled them out of the stabilizer. I went back to the hanging negs for another look and, wait, they don't look so bad now. Of course, they were OK.
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    See C41's easy really, no harder than B&W.

    Ian
     
  3. Akki14

    Akki14 Member

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    I forgot that. I remember developing a roll of 1970s kodacolor and it turned out bright blue on one side and bright yellow on the other until it dried then it was pretty normal looking.
     
  4. zenrhino

    zenrhino Member

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    Im looking really forward to developing my own c-41 when I get back in town from this trip. I love c-41 mono film and it'll be nice to save the money I spend getting it lab-processed.
     
  5. IloveTLRs

    IloveTLRs Member

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    I have a Naniwa Color Kit (home C-41 kit) but so far I haven't had the nuts to try it out yet
     
  6. Snapshot

    Snapshot Member

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    I keep meaing to try my hand at C-41. I'll definitely remember the fact that negatives will not look right until dry.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 3, 2008
  7. Akki14

    Akki14 Member

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    Specifically, the film will look like it's not been fixed enough usually - it'll be sort of a light haze covering the film until it dries. I kept having to convince myself I did it right because if it wasn't properly fixed (which is what I thought it was) i wouldn't be able to see through the film and see the images.
     
  8. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Just FYI, all chromogenic color films and papers produced today are hazy when wet. This is due to the fact that water has a different index of refraction than the coupler solvents used to incorporate the dyes. When they dry down, the indices approach each other and the material becomes transparent rather than cloudy.

    PE
     
  9. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    The C41 kit I first used (Ilford XP1 if memory serves) warned that the negatives would look cloudy until they dried. I'm glad that they gave the warning because it would be disconcerting.
     
  10. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    FWIW, fully processed and dried C-41 films, if dunked in water, take on the same appearance as freshly-processed and undried films. Since I'd washed some old C-41 films to remove some water stains from a flood before I'd ever processed C-41 film myself, I wasn't particularly shocked by the appearance of freshly-processed film; however, I did get a bit nervous when I dunked the first strip of lab-processed film in the water to clean off those water stains!