Can Someone Give a Summary of the Recent Kodak Color Papers?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by RedSun, Nov 15, 2012.

  1. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    Paper type, paper name, date discontinued, purpose of the paper (portrait, etc), speed, size, and other info

    Or let me know where I can get it from the web. Kodak has a bunch of info at its website, but I'm not sure if that is complete.
     
  2. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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  3. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    Links are no good.
     
  4. AgX

    AgX Member

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    seems Apug and Kodak don't seem to link...

    I tried posting the URL without linkage for copy and paste, but the Apug software always makes a shortened version of it.



    Go to the Kodak site,


    -) business to business

    -) Pro Photo Products

    -) Papers and Materials


    AND


    -) business to business

    -) Photo Specialty Products

    -) Retailers & Photofinishers

    -) Photofinishing Solutions

    -) Color Papers (AgX)
     
  5. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Member

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    Links work fine from here.
     
  6. AgX

    AgX Member

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    These links from Apug to Kodak don't work for me, neither those by Mark nor those made myself.
     
  7. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

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    Endura Premier, just google it yourself.
     
  8. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    I was there before. I thought it had more papers that it does not make any more....
     
  9. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    They work if you copy and paste.

    For some reason not directly. ???
     
  10. AgX

    AgX Member

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    As said I can't copy and paste them either. Always get that viglink thing.
    Nor can copy them from the website and past them as text into a posting.
     
  11. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

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    Go to the page for Endura Premier, then look for the link on the left for "Tech Pubs". At the bottom are the publications for discontinued papers.
     
  12. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    I got all of them. Thx.
     
  13. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    The Kodak links create re-direct problems here in APUG (in Firefox and Chrome, for me)

    Here is the Chrome response:

    [h=1]This webpage has a redirect loop[/h]The webpage at http://affiliates.digitalriver.com/z/37195/CD133407/cm4ktdoi6pnn////////// has resulted in too many redirects. Clearing your cookies for this site or allowing third-party cookies may fix the problem. If not, it is possibly a server configuration issue and not a problem with your computer.
    [h=2]Here are some suggestions:[/h]

    Error 310 (net::ERR_TOO_MANY_REDIRECTS): There were too many redirects.

    As mentioned, if you cut and paste the link into the address bar, it works fine.

    This seems to have started recently.

    I'm telling the moderators :smile:
     
  14. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Matt, as said in post #10 that cut&paste does not work for me in both cases.
    I only got IE 9.
     
  15. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    There is a long history of Kodak color papers, and I'm not sure what you mean by recent. As you can see from the Kodak links, there is also a difference between photofinishing papers and custom lab (and amateur lab) papers. If you go way back (the 1940s, or maybe late 30s), the first were photofinishing papers used exclusively by Kodak to print Kodacolor. Kodak also coated a special Kodachrome on fairly thick white plastic film to make Kodachrome prints from slides during this period. Kodak kept its color printing in house until the late 1950s when type C paper for printing color negatives was introduced. Very shortly later, type R paper for prints from color slides was introduced. (Ansco had long offered Printon plastic printing material for prints from slides.) Type C materials were a revolution in photography. Soon there were several imitators (generally inferior and incompatible) from various manufacturers. Kodak published its chemistry, and there were several companies (particularly Unicolor) that made compatible processing solutions. In the 1960s, Type C material was improved and renamed Ektacolor, several improvements in Ektacolor followed. During this period, Kodak also experimented with different surfaces for its color paper. Color paper was traditionally available only in F, glossy, but now Kodak introduced in in E (fine-grained luster), N (luster, smooth), and Y (luster, silk) surfaces as well. There may have been others as well.

    A major change happened in the mid 1970s, a little after Kodacolor II was introduced. The paper was improved greatly, especially in stability, and a new process was introduced for the paper. The new process eliminated the benzyl alcohol in the developer and improved the blix. I forget the name of this process, but it evolved over time into RA-4. My memory fails me for the exact chronology here. There was a name change (I forget what it was) to distinguish the new process material. I think it was about 1990 when Kodak introduced a new paper in three contrast grades - Portra, Supra, and Ultra - and the current RA-4 process. Kodak also continued to produce a reversal paper for printing slides up trough this period, with a process different and improved over the original Type R material. Sometime around 2000, Endura, with markedly improved stability, was introduced. The multiple contrasts were eliminated, and the metallic surface was introduced.

    This is pretty sketchy. Since it is from memory, it also may have some errors. Hopefully, others will correct those and will expand on the facts a bit. I have not included any of the history of Kodak's photofinishing materials, because I simply don't know it. But these were a separate line with their own characteristics and applications. I have also not included any history of the specialty products, such as the display films and print films.
     
  16. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    Not surprisingly, there were a number of things that I forgot in my previous post. While rummaging for some other data, I found a couple of things. Preceding Kodak Supra paper and its kin, in the 1980s, Kodak made Ektacolor 74 RC and 78 (Type 2492) paper. 78 had somewhat higher contrast than 74. They used the Ektaprint 2 processing chemicals. For printing from transparencies, Kodak made type 2203 paper, which used process R3. The papers changed again about 1985. The color negative materials continued to use the Ektprint 2 process. The reversal material, Kodak Ektachrome 22 paper, used process R-3000. There were a number of transparency materials that paralleled these papers.

    Two additional color processes deserve attention here. The Kodak Dye Transfer Process was actively marketed until just a few years ago. Dye Transfer Paper was not sensitized, but it was specially coated to accept the dyes from the transfer matrices. The Kodak Ektaflex PCT system, marketed in the 1980s, was unusual. It involved a special machine and a single solution for processing. It was designed for rapid processing of small quantities of prints. You made an exposure in the usual manner on a special film. Then you cranked the film into the machine where it was soaked in the activator solution and then sandwiched with the paper. The dyes transferred from the film to the paper print. The prints were exceptionally stable. PCT film was available for both negative and transparency printing.