Canon Elan 7e

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by j-dogg, Sep 29, 2010.

  1. j-dogg

    j-dogg Subscriber

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    Thought about getting one to put in my bag alongside my Digital Rebel. They can be had for pretty cheap much like all 35mm Canon EOS bodies.

    Anything I should watch out for before I grab one? :D
     
  2. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    Have you looked at an Eos 3? They are also pretty darned cheap and are more of a pro level camera, more rugged overall. That said, other than the fact that I own a 3 and have run about two rolls of film through it, I don't know much about either camera. Don't forget that your standard zoom (18-55 or whatever) won't work with any film cameras but most longer zooms will. (you probably knew that, but just in case...)
     
  3. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

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    As far as I know, 18-55 is one of the few that don't work. Many of the shorter zooms such as a 28-90 work super.
     
  4. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Lenses designed for digital EOS bodies will not fit conventional film EOS bodies as the clearance between the rear lens element flange and the mirror can certainly strike/break/warp the mirror and mirror box, additional to minor changes in mount hardware and contacts. Digital lenses have the designation EF-S. If you are unsure what can be fitted, ask somebody who is sure rather than risk damaging the camera.

    Many early EOS bodies are now quite old and would require a thorough going-over to look for undetected problems (bent lens contacts, damaged back cover pressure plate, damaged or broken back cover latch etc., etc.). Cameras with plastic rotating dials (Command Dial) are prone to stripping of the pawls/indents: this is a relatively minor but very common problem related to rough operation.
     
  5. dances_w_clouds

    dances_w_clouds Subscriber

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    My Elan 7e is a very quiet operating camera. Once you have everything set the way you like it the only change you need is on the main command dial. I bought mine and added the BP 300 battery case which fits my hand well. The quiet sounding works well for me because as soon as people "hear" a camera they want to pose for you. And this way I capture people in a comfortable setting which is best for all concerned. I always use manual focus because the when I am looking in the view finder I have to look at everything around the subject. That use to drive me crazy with the buzzing and adjusting it did no real purpose.

    Hey... I grew up with manual focus what can I say......
     
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  6. film_man

    film_man Member

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    It is a great camera, very quiet (probably one of the quietest 35mm SLRs) and you will be amazed at how nice the viewfinder is compared to your DRebel. However, if you can spend a bit more you can also consider the 3. It is a superb machine but it is a bit bigger/heavier than the 7e and much noisier (probably one of the noisiest 35mm SLRs). And the viewfinder is even better.
     
  7. j-dogg

    j-dogg Subscriber

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    I was torn between the Elan 7e, 3 or an EOS 1n, with hopes of using some of my digital EOS glass like my Tamron 18-270mm.

    Either way, the glass I get for this camera will work on my Rebel so it goes both ways, I shot an EF 75-300 on my Rebel for the longest time before I upgraded.
     
  8. dnjl

    dnjl Member

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    The Elan 7 is my primary body. It's cheap, extremely quiet, well built and has pretty much anything you'd need (apart from ultra high fps). The only thing I don't like about it is the relatively dark/yellowish viewfinder. There are several versions out there, the most advanced one has a date imprint function (which I don't really use). Also, if you don't need eye control you could buy an Eos 33, which might be slightly cheaper. By the way, a battery pack (the Bp-300) is a must have for this camera.
     
  9. j-dogg

    j-dogg Subscriber

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    Hmmmm, I think I'm gonna wait a bit and pony up the cash for the EOS 3 with the power booster, I had actually considered an EOS 1V but I can't justify the minimum 500-dollar entry fee and no guarantee my Tamron will work with it. Honestly I doubt I'll be using the Tamron on film since it is a Di-II; formatted for a crop sensor and from what I have heard on a 35mm setup it produces some epic vignetting.

    The next question I have to ask is what EF glass should I look for, and is the original 75-300 Japanese-built EF really better than the newer non-IS ones? I've been shooting autofocus Minolta for a while and been wanting to make the jump to Canon since I already spent a bazillion on my Rebel and its accessories, why not have a nice digital system with a 35mm backup, or is it a nice 35mm system with a digital backup. :laugh:

    thanks
     
  10. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    When the EF 75-300 with IS was introduced late in 1995, it was perceived through in situ use as a dud: heavy, lacking in optical refinement, lousy speed and a high power drain on cameras reliant on a 2CR5 battery. I owned one with an EOS 1 (later EOS 5); the former camera was depleted fairly rapidly with the 75-300 with IS engaged. The later incarnation (with II on its outer barrel) offered some improvement in gyro response and less of a whallop to the battery. Two internal elements were redesigned and a few other worthwhile improvements made. The maximum aperture of f5.6 at the tele end might still be regarded as a bit of a bummer, but should not be a weighting factor when cost is also a consideration.

    The difference will be obvious when you move from the 75-300 IS to an L-series lens without IS. The consumer/enthusiast level EF 75-300 with IS has stock Canon optics. The equivalent L-series telezoom with IS has an CaF2 (artificial calcium fluorite) element to almost nullify chroma and astigma. You pay a price for this high refinement. It is a personal choice based on what photography you do as to whether or not you will lean towards an "it'll do the job" consumer-level IS-equipped lens as opposed to an equivalent L-series, with or without IS (a number of L-series lenses do have it). Likely prime considerations are weight and cost. Lots of things to consider!
     
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  11. CD55

    CD55 Member

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    I bought the 7e recently from someone who went digital and I still can't believe how much I got it for. I bought it as a replacement for my EOS Elan/100 due to the sticky shutter problem. I was at first wasn't going to use the eye control since I wear glasses but it actually works well. It's very quiet especially when rewinding and it isn't too heavy. One thing I don't like about it is in low light, the pop-up flash gives out a pulse of light in order to focus. So if you're looking to do low light photography that won't surprise your subject, this camera probably won't work for you.
     
  12. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Oh those pesky little auto pop-up flashes...
    Woe betide you if you use this camera in covert surveillance...
     
  13. film_man

    film_man Member

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    The popup only goes up and fires if you are in the green modes. Go to P/Av/Tv/M and it stays down.
     
  14. CD55

    CD55 Member

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    Oh yeah I know it stays down in the creative mode but the problem then becomes the camera having to keep refocusing. After a number of times it just becomes frustrating. This is one area where the EOS Elan/100 has an advantage since it uses an infrared system. If the 7e had the infrared system it would be the perfect camera for my needs.
     
  15. j-dogg

    j-dogg Subscriber

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    I am quite versed in the newer Canon EF glass, and have thought about a 70-200 f4L as my next purchase, best of all I could use it on both bodies and they can be had for relatively cheap.

    I didn't think the old school 75-300 glass were available with IS, I don't need it for my film rig I use it on my digital walkaround setup.

    The lenses I'm talking about are like the 28-90, 80-200 and various 3rd party glass. In particular the Tamron 70-300 LD macro 1:2.....I have this exact lens for my Maxxum 4 and it produces stellar results on pro film.
     
  16. j-dogg

    j-dogg Subscriber

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    Look what just waltzed into my truck while on a job.

    [​IMG]

    So far, impressed. Shoots faster than my Rebel, came with a free roll of Superia, bag, all the cleaning toys. 130-dollar pawnshop score. The 28-90 USM on it is impressive for a kit lens, very sharp and the USM is quiet and very fast when mounted to my Rebel.

    Upgrades are going to be a vertical grip, Japanese 75-300, and various other lenses. My Canon EOS system is almost complete, hope to step up to some L-glass before my brother's wedding.

    Holding off on the F1 for now......it's been on CL for two weeks so it isn't going anywhere.
     
  17. Mark Fisher

    Mark Fisher Subscriber

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    Elan 7 is a good choice.....very light and quiet. Get a 50mm prime (1.4 or 1.8) and be happy.
     
  18. j-dogg

    j-dogg Subscriber

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    I'm split between a 50 or an 85....85 will be great for portraits and weddings but the 50 can get more stuff in the shot.
     
  19. dnjl

    dnjl Member

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    Why not get both, considering the 50mm f1.8 costs less than 100$? It is a piece of plastic junk that feels like a china toy, but the optical quality is very good. There aren't many good excuses not to own one, actually.