Canon EOS 1V?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by Loulou, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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    I need to replace my Canon EOS 5, the shutter is toast along with the mode dial so it is not worth repairing. I have found a Canon EOS 1V for sale but it is a bit over my budget. Does anyone have an opinion on this camera? I need to stick with EOS bodies as I have several lenses that I love to shoot with and don't want to replace them too. Thanks.
     
  2. Laurent

    Laurent Subscriber

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    If it's even marginally better than the EOS3 (I own a 3 since 2001, always drooled over the 1V) I'd say it's worth it !

    Otherwise, an EOS3 is a helluva camera, I never regretted buying it !
     
  3. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    I use one regularly.
    Fantastic system camera.
    I cant complain about one thing because even if you think it's too heavy w/PB E2 you can install the plain grip and you have a compact setup.

    I waited and got a great deal on mine but it took several months. They still command top dollar.
    I had a 3 and still have a 1n also and the V is the first one I grab.
     
  4. davidmarinero

    davidmarinero Member

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    I am very happy with my EOS3. It has one function that no other EOS camera has: the ability to focus on the spot you are looking at in the viewfinder!! This is huge and reduces a lot your need to recompose after focus while keeping focus fast.
    The following table compares these cameras: http://photonotes.org/reviews/1-1N-3-1V/
     
  5. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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    My EOS 5 also had that feature but I never really used it. Thanks for the link.

     
  6. flatulent1

    flatulent1 Subscriber

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    I have both the 1V and the 3, both fabulous cameras, both highly recommended.

    I'm also going to recommend you look at the Elan 7N or 7NE. Lighter weight, less expensive, but no less capable than the pro series. They're also astonishingly quiet. I have two.
     
  7. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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    Thank you all for your replies. I've been doing a lot more research after reading them and I am still leaning towards blowing the budget and going for the 1V. I've seen it reviewed as the best film camera ever made for one and if it is the best then there is nowhere to upgrade to so it will be a one off purchase. I also like the weather proofing that is built in, I am getting more into landscape photography so being able to take it out in the snow or rain without worrying too much is appealing to me. I have a week to make a final decision so if anyone else has an opinion or view on the 1V I would be very pleased to hear it.
     
  8. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Some personal experience in hindsight; I owned one for two years before downsizing to its predecesor, the EOS1N:

    It's heavy, very, very robust, easy to navigate (if you are used to Canon cameras), water and vapor sealed, has a 150,000 cycle high speed shutter, too many custom functions to be of sensible use at any one time, can (as can the 1N) chew through 36 exposures in 3 seconds (if you're not on cue as to what settings are where and when!) and will keep you focus of attention among the digital brigade simply because the 1V, when it was released, was the definitive camera for those who wanted the best and needed speed and refinement; nothing lacking there. The strongest point though is in the vast improvement to flash metering, something that was sorely lacking with earlier EOS bodies including the venerated 1N (discontinued 2000).

    Good examples can be found readily but whatever you buy should be bench tested (Canon's own technies plug in a computer to download shutter cycles, drive information the number of actual exposures (as opposed to the number of rolls for the EOS 1N), flash and overall system metrics e.g. faults, custom function settings, shutter/aperture accuracy. This assumes the techies actually still have these analysers around.

    The EOS 5 is a good and reliable performer — until that Achilles Heel, the mode selector dial, breaks. Mine did so twice, twice repaired, still holding, then the lens release button broke (another known weakness for the 5 and 3), that was repaired and still going, but now the back cover latch is broken; I retired the 5 four years ago, using it since 1993 to 2003: it faithfully captured all the scenes on Velvia that I committed to the Ilfochrome Classic process.

    Your biggest gripe over time though might be the weight of the camera; it was too much for me (I have small hands and mild dystrophy) after just a handful of bushwalks (the 1N with PDBE1 is a little better). The EOS 3 is no substitute if you need speed, reliability and brute force; but the 1V is probably an overkill for pottering around the landscape, but the same too can be said of the 1N and legions of other workhorse cameras: if it rows your boat and you really want it, there's just one thing to do: bust the bank! :smile:
     
  9. jcc

    jcc Member

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    I sold my 1v a couple months ago, and quickly regretted it after thinking up another project for it. Just got another one last week. Absolutely love it! Truly, the ultimate 35mm EOS.
     
  10. munz6869

    munz6869 Subscriber

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    I rarely use my 1V, even though: (1) It is an awesome example of camera construction and design, (2) I use Canon for not-film, and (3) I even have that stupid cable and ridiculous custom function software... because it's such a giant. EVEN though I mostly shoot Large Format or my Fuji 6x8, when it comes to 35mm, my favourite these last few years is the venerable Olympus OM4 = a great SMALL camera... This is a surprise even to me...

    Marc!
     
  11. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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    Thank you again for the replies. I'm OK with a heavy camera, I'm used to carrying around a couple of them & my intention is to focus on just one body & two lenses for a while so overall weight will probably be less. I also have a Contaflex which I use when I only want to carry a small camera. I'm arranging to meet the seller next week so I can get my hands on the 1V and feel it; will make a final decision then though I think I am going to go ahead & buy it.
     
  12. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    I'd add one final tidbit for thought.

    It's a fine camera, Canon's finest, and will faithfully serve. But at the end of the day, one fact remains: it is a 35mm camera, with all the constraints and waste of 35mm (36 exposures is way, way too much for most people now; roll interchanges are best).

    Your money could be spent on diversifying your equipment to include medium format (any number of these formats are around 400% bigger than 35mm and subsequently have sharpness to really, really impress the masses). MF will provide a learning curve far removed from the brute looks and ease of use and high level automation and fuzzy intelligence that the 1V provides on tap.
    Something to remember: We all crave to use the latest and greatest, biggest and best. But you don't need a flash camera to create beautiful photographs. :smile: A few people here on APUG create their works on cameras that can be 80 and 130 years old (LF and ULF). A lot of mine are also done on a pinhole camera. But I'm not going to convince you to change your mind, just be careful before parting with a big sum of money.

    I'm reminded: a mint condition 1V was on sale in Melbourne (near where I live) about a fortnight ago for $975 (body only); I belive it was sold last weekend. That's an extremely low price for that marque that once sold for more than $3,500 body only.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 26, 2013
  13. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    A few recent thoughts... I was shooting Hurricane sandy on both my 1V and my 5D mark II (Digital) both are very nice, but even 10 years later, the 1V outshines the 5D mk II in many ways, the 45 point autofocus system is just spectacular, perhaps that's not as appealing to you but the 1V is the only camera I rarely ever have to "focus and recompose" the autofocus point area is fairly wide spread even though centered like all autofocus systems, but the points just go anywhere and it's easy to navigate. Two, if has a download system where you can download the metadata of your shots to the computer (mind you windows 95 is the newest version the program supports and you need the cable) which was once invaluable when I spend a month traveling the country going through almost 100 rolls of film, not having to carry a pen or paper, all the shoot data was recorded and is now printed out on a sheet, roll number, (which it will imprint on the leader) f stop, shutter speed, date, time, film type, camera lens name and specific focal length used etc. Pretty snazzy. Finally, while shooting the hurricane, a giant wave came up on me and crashed on top of me soaking both cameras, the 5D mk II ceased working shortly after but the 1V had no harm done. I sent them both off to be cleaned by Canon and see if the 5D could be repaired. They were able to fix the 5D THANK GOODNESS ($2500 camera) and while speaking to the lady on the phone about the cleaning and what had been done, she said she hadn't seen any film cameras come in the past year, however the ONLY film camera they still had parts for was the 1V... so there's also more chance of repair for the 1V, and it's almost impervious to weather :smile: Good luck! I love mine!
     
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  15. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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    Thanks for your thoughts Poisson. Thing is I really would like a good 35mm camera, both mine are now broken so this will be my primary camera and not a diversification to my collection as I don't have a collection as such. I have shot some medium format, my other half is also a keen photographer and I am lucky that he is so generous with his cameras that I can use them when I wish too. He actively encourages me to do MF. I loved most of the results I got with MF but I find it really difficult to get the results I would like to when I do my favourite photography which was the combination of my EOS 5 & my 100mm lens shooting macros. I just can't get close enough with MF, there probably is a way I just haven't figured it out yet. I also like quite blurry, mostly out of focus shots when I do macro so sharpness is not something I am looking for here. You can see what I mean here with some macros I posted on Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/louise_aren/sets/72157631933306792/detail/

    What I am ultimately looking for is my workhorse camera, one that I can learn learn inside out and back to front that I can grow with. I'm not looking to change cameras again for a long time if I buy this, I wouldn't even be looking for one if my 5 hadn't broken. But I do want to make a sound investment in a camera that will challenge me and will continue to work for a long time to come.



     
  16. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    If all you do are macro's then any cheap EOS camera should do, you don't need the 1V, its an amazing camera, and great for hard weather and tough photoshoots, but the macro stuff is usually done with manual focus and so you could probably get away with just using a rebel body... spend $100 instead of $800 ...

    Also for MF macro, I use my Mamiya RZ67 with extension tubes, you can get 1:1, you can shoot many images without a macro lens because of the bellows on the RZ system... you can also get the RB system which is just as good for your purposes just a bit older version, and if you ever decide to upgrade form the RB to the RZ system, the lenses can be used on both.

    I almost feel I messed up with buying the RZ system, as the RB doesn't require batteries and I do a lot of long exposure shots at night these days and my batteries often fail on hour long exposures :sad:

    I digress... point is, take a look, the RB67 is super heavy, but certainly really nice macro's

    EDIT: oh and CHEAP!! look on ebay, they are going for like nothing! I got a whole system for $400... and that was the RZ67 which is newer, body, 2 lenses, 3 backs, polaroid back, viewfinder all for $400
     
  17. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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    Macros are only part of what I like to do but they are my favourite part. I'm also getting more into landscapes, I'm going on a week long Bruce Percy course in April and I need to be familiar with what ever camera I buy by then as I would like to do the course shooting mainly colour slide.

    I have tried doing something similar to my 35mm macro's with an RZ67, totally messed that up. That camera takes a bit of getting used to! I would like to try it again though, get to know the camera better and see what happens. Thanks for the tips on the extension tubes, I will look into that. I did get some results I was happy with when I shot with a Mamiya 7, that is a camera that I like. These are camera's I get to borrow to try out.

     
  18. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    Love the Mamiya 7 but not for Macro's...

    If you don't project your slides then shooing 6x7 chromes is just amazing,putting then on the light box... It's so fantastic!

    Best of luck!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  19. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    You will need a very sturdy tripod with the 1V and mirror lock-up + 2 second self timer engaged; it's size and weight gives a handy buffer against vibration, but macro requires care with a big camera. You might need to manually select a focusing point from the many that, to quite a few photographers, are inconveniently placed in a central cluster; this camera, like the EOS 5, EOS 3 and 1N variants, may still hunt and scratch in macro. The EF 100mm f2.8 macro would be a best match with manual focus engaged.

    I do not agree that any cheap EOS (or any other body) is OK for macro. Cheap cameras do not have the realiability that is so much a requirement for everyday landscape and critical photography.

    Have a look at the EOS resource created in Malaysia and of which I am an occasional contributor and moderator for the message board there: http://mir.com.my/ navigate to the EOS1V section; it's thick, detailed, technical and sometimes heavy reading with the occasional fractured ChingLish. :smile:

    The good thing about your choice, despite what else is said here, is that it will keep you away from the sickly scourge of digital! Bonza! :smile:
     
  20. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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    Thanks for the link, I found the correct section and will take a read through. My EF 100mm f2.8 macro is one of the lenses I use a lot, not just for macros, it a fantastic lens. I also have a pretty decent tripod, it has been used with a Mamyia RZ67 so I think it would cope with a 1V. I realise there are a lot of good cheap Canon's out there but I don't want to get something that I have to replace again soon. I only got my 5 last June so it didn't last long, I know it had been well looked after and not used much but it still broke in what I think of as a short space of time. Reliability is a big factor for me here.

    I'm more than happy to keep away from the "scourge of digital" :smile: Since my two analougue Canon's are broken I had to dig out my 40D last weekend to take photos with, what a soulless experience that was :tongue:.

     
  21. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    My first professional digital was the 40D, I rather think it's a fairly good camera as digitals go, but yes, it is still digital, the image is what you put into it, if you created something beautiful, there's a little soul in there...
     
  22. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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    I've made many beautiful images with my 40D and many that I am very happy with. For me it is the process that is soulless, the instant gratification if chimping, downloading onto a computer, photoshop... It all leaves me feeling unsatisfied compared to loading up a film and the surprise & anticipation when the roll is developed and you see the negative for the first time. Digital certainly has a place & I will keep my 40D for sure but it is not where my soul is.

     
  23. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    Ok fair enough, I can relate to that.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  24. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Loulou, I too can relate to how you feel with digital.

    For me though, the icing on the cake is the analogue-to-digital and finally print, then mat and framing; it's not lacking soul, but a lot of highly refined technique that was first hatched way back in 1990. The 'transition process' is the beauty is in the finished image with very little necessary 'tweaking' by digital means and is a very, very valuable experience in this day and age where digital will eventually, at some indeterminate point of time in the future, replace film. I'm earnestly hoping that's no time soon — not in my lifetime at least, because I'm having too much fun with analogue to digital and the team I work with are bringing my images to beauty where they are shown on my walls. I would never ever go back to the all-analogue Ilfochrome Classic process — I would describe it as a callous waste of money with little wiggle room for even the most basic of improvements other than contrast masking.

    I do not and never will store images on a computer or negatives/trannies stuffed in folders (nor post them to the web, other than what I specifically and necessarily choose to amongst close friends) never to see the light of day. I certainly hope you print and frame your images from the EOS 1V: it's not a beast to botch any job on its own.
     
  25. Loulou

    Loulou Member

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    I did it, I bought the 1V yesterday! The camera is in perfect condition and only had had 57 rolls of film through it so far. When I picked it up it just felt right and when I attached my favorite lens that I had brought with me it felt perfect in my hand. I'm really looking forward to getting to know the camera and hopefully together we can shoot some great photos.
     
  26. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    How do you know the roll count?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk