Canon EOS 3 problem - any ideas?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by thomsonrc, Jun 29, 2008.

  1. thomsonrc

    thomsonrc Member

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    Hi

    I bought a secondhand Canon EOS 3 which the previous owner said was in perfect working order. Everything seemed fine but half way through the first roll the shutter seemed to jam. After a while it worked again, but then the autofocus seemed not to work properly, and the viewfinder seemed dim. It couldn't find focus or got the wrong focus. After a while I rewound the roll and fired the shutter a lot and this seemed to cure it.

    Does anyone know what is likely to have caused this and if it will happen again? Thanks

    Ritchie
     
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  2. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    Were you changing lenses while this was happening? Some off brand lenses will cause lockups, otherwise the contacts on the lens or the camera may have oxidised while sitting on the shelf.
     
  3. Mark Mellen

    Mark Mellen Member

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    Does this camera have motor drive? Also could be battery failure, dirty contacts. I own a EOS3 that is rarely used and will act like what you described from storing the camera for long peroids of time with the batteries in it. Usually a good cleaning resolves the issue.. Just a thought if you have not considered this yet...Good luck Mark
     
  4. thomsonrc

    thomsonrc Member

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    Gary - I wasnt changing lenses, so I dont think it was that.

    Mark - You could be right the previous owner had not used it for a year or so, I'll try cleaning the contacts and battery

    thanks.

    Ritchie
     
  5. Wolfeye

    Wolfeye Subscriber

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    I too own an EOS-3 and it has the occasional quirk. I think in mine the AF point wouldn't center with this one lens. Sadly, these cameras are electronic so they can both go bad and be uneconomical to repair. I haven't used my EOS gear very much because I've been loving my FD gear lately, but I probably will this weekend. Maybe I'll do a EOS-3 and Reala versus my 5D comparison.

    One thing I have noticed is that if you're using an M42 adapter, be careful. Some lenses will protrude into the mirror box just enough to catch the mirror on the way up or down, especially when focused at infinity. I had that happen twice before I realized what was going on. Non-Canon lenses can also cause problems. Usually those show up as EEE messages though. My guess would be batteries or battery contacts as Mark suggests.

    Please let us know?
     
  6. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    The EOS 3 has been bedevilled with quirks (and in sometimes, major faults), both major and minor, since it was released, and many owners silently put up with quirks such as the oft-reported "sticky-shutter button" syndrome. I am suspicious of the motives of people selling capable workhorse cameras like the generally very good EOS 3 and saying they work "perfectly" but can provide no factual proof. If you're serious about photography, you'd buy from an established pro dealer where the history of the equipment can be looked at; I have done that for all of my EOS bodies. Active cameras should be bench-inspected by technicians once every 12 months (or 3 years if used very little). A flashing warning signal, such as "BC" or "EEEE" on many EOS cameras, particularly the EOS 1N, RS, 5, 50E et al, is a sure sign of trouble which can range from poor battery contacts (a problem with some models using 2CR5 and other batteries) or bent/sticky AF contacts in the mirror box. And lastly, never ever mothball cameras with batteries in them: all out! Periodically fire the shutter a few times at various speeds with a lens in place during long spells from action, and store in a cool and dry area. Fungus growing on internal circuits over time, exposure to coastal areas then very moist/humid environments are also precursors to serious trouble (I have seen an EOS 5 that refused to fire because of fungal growths). Have the camera professionally checked out.

    .:: GRH ::.
    Moderator, Canon EOS1N-series message board, KL (AU)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2008
  7. Chazzy

    Chazzy Member

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    Well, there go my thoughts of getting an EOS 3 to try.
     
  8. Travis Nunn

    Travis Nunn Member

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    Hmmm. I've never had a problem with my EOS 3 or my Elan II. I guess I must just be in denial... :rolleyes:
     
  9. thomsonrc

    thomsonrc Member

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    Well I only bought it to make some pictures of my son (aged 18 months) as he runs around, as I've never tried autofocus before. So maybe I'm not serious about photography. That said I do have medium format equipment which I bought from dealers which I use for 'serious' photography.


    When it did work I couldnt really get the hang of it anyway, too many buttons and functions for someone brought up on the Nikon FM2, Mamiya 6 and Fuji GW69II. Wish I'd never bought it.

    Ritchie
     
  10. ath

    ath Member

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    Well in this case I recommend to sell the EOS3 and buy a FM2. There's no sense in using equipment someone dislikes except one is forced to.

    The EOS3 has really much options but can be used in a very basic way: set it to M and your preferred metering pattern; and after switching it on you only have to adjust time and aperture, focus and release. Just like a FM2 - even with manual focus if you change the screen.
    The EOS3 gives you choice - the FM2 not. Some people like this, others not.

    My EOS3 operates like a charm, except the occasional scratch in the film from dust.

    P.S.: Lithium batterys are sometimes a bit strange. I've had a few from a big brand (i.e. someone, who really manufactures them) developing a high internal resistance. They can even get a bit lazy when not in use. Clean the contacts, use the battery and in doubt get a new (good) one.
     
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  11. ath

    ath Member

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    Never heard of this before and I'm reading about the EOS3 in several forums since years. The exposure issue with the first batch is the only problem I'm aware of.
     
  12. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    I can speak highly of Nikon's FE2 for its simplicity and excellent ease in the hand. I went back to manual focus after being very undecided with AF in its early years (1985 onward). Today I use an EOS 1N, EOS 1N RS and a long-suffering, much repaired EOS 5. I've used the EOS 3 as a 'shoe-in' with no operational problems to speak of in hostile SW Tasmanian weather. Really, I think the EOS 3 is too much of a camera to just pick up and run off a few photos of bub. Taken an example: my mint EOS 1N, for all its fearsome reputation, was bought from an owner who only used it to snap his wife conducting mass on Sundays (!)... a grand total of only 8 rolls of el cheapo film through it... (this was verified via bench testing with the device Canon uses to "interrogate" the camera for operational and statistical information).

    There is no harm in using old cameras and the Nikons (FE2 FM, FA), Olympus (OM 1n, 1N, 2N, 4Ti) and Canons all have their admirers. If I could find one I'd pick up an FE2 and maybe FM2 ... "just for old time's sake" LOL!

    .:: GRH ::.
    Moderator, Canon EOS1N-series message board, KL (AU)
     
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  13. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    EOS 3: nothing to be afraid of


    Spurious reports from 1998 to 2003 of mirror failure after locking up, overlapping frames and erroneous Tv/Av values. The 3s I have used (2) have worked reliably. There is a general opinion that faults affected an early batch of this model. Another observation: users should thoroughly acquaint themselves with the behaviour of the CF (custom function) combinations: it is not implausible that a CF function is engaged which (intentionally) alters the behaviour of the camera's controls or response and owners can mistakenly interpret this as a "fault", and when working quickly you can certainly be tricked. Historically I've made this silly faux pas with my EOS 1N/RS; I keep a card with the camera telling what is engaged, where and the effect!

    I'd use the EOS 3 any time with confidence, new, (the ECF is especially good) but second hand models ideally need to go through professional bench checks.

    .:: GRH ::.
    Moderator, Canon EOS1N-series message board, KL (AU)
     
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