Canon EOS Elan 7NE(30v) Vs Nikon N80 (F80)

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by ajuk, Aug 13, 2005.

  1. ajuk

    ajuk Member

    Messages:
    1,108
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2005
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I was playing with a friends Dynax 40 the other day and I thought WOW it was so light the AF was so fast (although the lens itself wasn't) and the features like the flash popping up automatically when the light wasn't good enough had me drooling over it. OK that is one of the very automatic futures but I don't have to use it.
    OK So I was supprised at how good modern film cameras have got.
    I Also went and played with an F80 in Dixons and WOW it was so quiet.
    I tend to miss too many shots with my OM-10,
    I know that primes produce better results but so does 100 speed film, and I found that I got better results with 400 speed film, when it gets dull, the reason was that 100 speed was so slow it was counter productive, I got more shots with the 400 speed. And as I have seen 400 speed film is pretty good these days. I get thought lots of Superia 400 and XP2. Same with prime lenses I don't get the shot because I cant get close enough Well not with out getting spotted.
    Also these cameras are so much quicker to use, no need to spend time focusing, and winding, I find I am not very good at it and I missed a really great split second moment the other day while getting focus.
    I will be buying a Nikon or Canon Prime eventually (An AF 50mm 1.8 just like the Zuiko I have now) But I zoom Will Be a good start as I don't have that much money, I intend to keep my OM-10 (sell the OM-30) and use that for landscapes until I can afford some modern Primes.

    I don't think I want to go with Minolta, because the camera I buy now will probably be the mount I will stick with forever. I was thinking more of the Nikon F80 or Canon EOS 30v because I can get it so cheap on the net at the moment (although some of the F80s tend to be N80s smuggled from aboard)

    So anybody have any suggestions. I have also noticed that even thought the 30v doesn't cost a lot more new or second hand, they don't often come up on eBay while there are lots of F80s. I suppose the main features I want are very Fast AF, A very wide range of ISO speeds (for Pushing) A longer metered exposure (my OM-10 gives up after 8 Seconds no matter what) and a good lens selection.

    (One thing about that guy with his Minolta, He uses it as a P&S, He basicly went into Jessops, and was looking at the Digi cams, and he saw the SLRs were the same price and he said he thought sod that Ill get one of them, Supprised more P&S people don't notice, What look to them as the big cameras pros use, going for the same price as P&S digital more often.)
     
  2. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,462
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Montgomery,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Ajuk,
    The two cameras you're looking at are equivalent. I don't use either but have sold both. Canon has the price advantage when you get to adding lenses & tend to be more innovative in lens design. Nikon seems to be resting on it's laurels as a historically pro tool and is more conservative when it comes to introducing new lenses.
    Physical size may be a deciding factor too, Nikon is just slightly more compact than the Canon.
    When it comes to lens choice both mfrs. will give great results from prime lenses but I would stay away from the "G" lenses from Nikon primarily from a durability standpoint(plastic mounts).
    For what it's worth, in 35mm I use mainly Pentax MX & KX after using Nikon for years.
     
  3. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

    Messages:
    1,897
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Location:
    Saint Paul, MN
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have always used Nikons, but I think either of these cameras will work just fine for you. One note on the Nikon G lenses, the G designation only refers to the lack of an aperture ring, which you won't use on the F80 anyway. They started out as the cheapies, and you do have to watch out for those, but some pro or near pro level G lenses have now been introduced that are very nice lenses. I would also consider avoiding the kit lens that is available with the camera (likely with either camera), at least take a good look at it, the plastic lens mouts are really not meant for someone who will really change their lenses very often.

    Have fun!

    Paul.
     
  4. Pete H

    Pete H Member

    Messages:
    771
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Location:
    Stavanger or
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I agree with Shaggy about Canon v. Nikon lenses, but Nikon still does a very good range. My significant other bought an Elan 7E at the same time as I bought an N80. Features and price are very similar. Our preferences came down to ergonomics - to me the Nikon controls are more intuitive & better laid out and it feels better in the hand. Of course that's a personal choice - can you borrow both for a days shooting to see which you prefer?
     
  5. djklmnop

    djklmnop Member

    Messages:
    230
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2004
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    N80 has spot meter :smile:
     
  6. ajuk

    ajuk Member

    Messages:
    1,108
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2005
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Seriously the canon has no spot meter?
     
  7. Kiron Kid

    Kiron Kid Member

    Messages:
    441
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Shooter:
    35mm
    It's 35mm shooting. How important is a spot meter, with this type of shooting? It's not like we're practitioners of the Zone system, knocking out 30x36" prints.....

    Kiron Kid
     
  8. djklmnop

    djklmnop Member

    Messages:
    230
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2004
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    And if we are?
     
  9. Daniel Lawton

    Daniel Lawton Member

    Messages:
    474
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The 7NE also has a mirror lockup feature which the Nikon lacks. I've always been amazed as to why Nikon won't put this feature on anything but there highly expensive top of the line model. I believe the N80 will prefire the mirror when the timer mode is used but I don't find that to be as convenient as locking up the mirror when I want to. Canon also integrates newer more innovative features into their less costly lenses such as Image Stabilization whereas with Nikon you have to spend serious money on glass before you can get this feature. Other than that, both systems are top notch and should serve you well depending on what your personal style is. I doubt you would be highly disappointed either way.
     
  10. Kiron Kid

    Kiron Kid Member

    Messages:
    441
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Oh. I was just kidding. But keep in mind, that we're talking roll film, not sheet film here. I'm a practitioner of the Zone system too. However, to achieve it's full benefits, one must soup the frames individually. Not possible with roll film.

    Kiron Kid
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Daniel Lawton

    Daniel Lawton Member

    Messages:
    474
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The Elan has an option that Canon calls partial metering where an area taking up 10% of the viewfinder at the center of the scene is used. I've found this mode to be more than adequate for the quasi-zone system methods most roll film users like myself partake in.
     
  12. djklmnop

    djklmnop Member

    Messages:
    230
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2004
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Spot meter is still useful not merely for the Zone System but for isolated readings on surface values. Slide film users will find it benificial if they want to specifically place highlight values. The Zone System is intended for sheet film, sure. But spot meter is still highly useful for 35mm to determine range-of-light and shadow placement interpretation off a subject. The Zone System may not be 100% effective with roll film, but it will allow you to predict the outcome of your final image within the given limits of development. One can judicially determine the final printing needs from the predicted outcome of the negative and visualize the printing needs (grade) to
    match what the negative has given. There are also secondary options, such as Selenium toning the negative to gain a stop of higlight, etc. Photography is only as difficult as one wants to make it, and the more difficult we make it, the more flexibility we will have in our creative options.

    Perhaps I am taking your comment too personally, but it just sounds too much like a digital photographer's version of, "You don't need to learn exposure, fix it in Photoshop, later." I doubt that is your intention, but those who are not as knowledgable about the subject and are seeking advice for the first time are going to disregard the importance of spot meter and won't bother to understand why. The best answer they will be able to give is, "because someone told me I didn't need it."

    Andy
     
  13. modafoto

    modafoto Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2003
    Location:
    Ã…rhus, Denma
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I have tried both (and have the predecessor EOS 30).

    I find the Canon to be placed somewhere between the F80 and the F100 when it comes to quality, features and the way it is build. I vote for the Canon!
     
  14. FrankB

    FrankB Member

    Messages:
    2,147
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2003
    Location:
    Northwest UK
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    A friend has the EOS 30, I have an F80, another friend has a Minolta Dynax 5.

    All are excellent cameras. All have excellent lenses available for them. All have very good and slightly different feature sets. All have different quirks to their handling.

    My advice would be to go to a good dealer and handle each of the cameras. Find which of them fits your hand and requires no thought at all to locate each of the most used features. Check you can find the on/off switch without even looking. Set the shutter speed and aperture on each and see which was easiest. Raise it to your eye and change focus points without shoving your thumb up your nostril (I'm a left-eye shooter!)!

    You will then know which camera to buy!

    All the best,

    Frank
     
  15. Bighead

    Bighead Member

    Messages:
    471
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2005
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    With a grain of salt. I use a N80... Looking back, I wish I would have bought a used N90S and bought some clean primary lenses from KEH or something.... But, as it stands, its a nice camera. The AF system in dark spaces is a let down. It uses one of those little lights, then focuses. Very slow and sometimes it won't get there in time if at all. Starting out, pinching pennies, I bought 2 of the G lenses. One is a 28-70 and the other is a 70-300... They are plastic but they are also very light. God forbid you destroy one, but they are so cheap. Buy another... Its not the attitude to have going into it but its what I have and its what I am faced with. I also bought an 85 1.8, non G lenses. Of course, its my work horse for weddings and stuff and the others are great for travel and street shooting. I have the 4 AA battery grip for it, which makes it a little more substancial for my big hands. I am disappointed that it doesn't have the vertical shutter release button on it, which looks very unorthodox when using on my flash bracket. I don't know. I find the controls to be very easy. After 150 rolls, its certainly an extension of me. No looking, I know where everything is and I can change settings and make adjustments very quickly.
     
  16. Kiron Kid

    Kiron Kid Member

    Messages:
    441
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I'm in the market, and after handling these rigs, I've decided upon a used N90s, in fantastic condition. It'll accept my mf lenses, and I' already own a couple of high end Nikon flash units. I'll be picking it up Saturday. It's for my girlfriend, but maybe she'll allow me to use it from time to time. I still love and use my FM's, FE's and FE-2's, on a regular basis. I'm thinking of the Nikon 28-105 AF for it. Any suggestions?

    Kiron Kid
     
  17. FrankB

    FrankB Member

    Messages:
    2,147
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2003
    Location:
    Northwest UK
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Yup, I suggest you buy it!

    I have the same lens and refuse to be separated from it. The thing is pretty much worshipped on the Nikon user group site (Nikonians). Accept no substitute.
     
  18. Kiron Kid

    Kiron Kid Member

    Messages:
    441
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Frank B

    I've found my Kiron 28-105, to be a bit sharper and better built, but she needs an auto focus lens. I'm sure that the Nikon version will be more than adequate. Thanks to everyone for the advice.

    Kiron Kid