Canon mirror lockup nonsense

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by michael_r, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    Some of you may recall I was looking into getting a used EOS 1v so that I could buy a Canon 24mm TSE II. This is my only Canon gear. You may also recall mirror lockup is a very important feature to me (as it should be to anyone). Some of you warned me in advance of the clumsy way of engaging mirror lockup on these Canon cameras. I knew it would be a hassle but worth the effort since this is a fantastic lens.

    Anyhow I've been practicing getting used to the 1v, and even though I've got it all quite smooth now in terms of operation, I'd just like to say indeed the mirror lockup feature on this camera is ridiculous and irritating. There is no excuse for this. For serious photographers, mirror lockup is a feature I consider to be one of the basic necessities, and it should be treated as such on any camera claimed to be for professional use. That means having this feature accessible on the camera body, where it can easily be engaged in any situation including low light. Ideally it should be a mechanical button. Failing that, it should at least have its own dedicated electronic button on the camera. Having to open the side door, fiddle with the tiny custom function button, and then scroll through the functions etc, is horrible. That is the kind of procedure that should be reserved for one-off, weirdo functions you might only need once in a blue moon, not mirror lockup. And why should I have to be able to see the screen or viewfinder to engage something as simple as mirror lockup? It's also worth pointing out the mirror should come down when you want, not automatically when the shutter closes. The whole thing is just dumb.
     
  2. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Maybe this will help Michael...

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
     
  3. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    It does!
     
  4. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    But you must consider which modern camera has mirror lockup? The F5 does but it's older than the EOS-1v. The F6 mirror lockup isn't very straight forward either. I guess as manufacturers are making new models they consider mirror lockup as unimportant feature.
     
  5. Helinophoto

    Helinophoto Member

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    Hehe

    I need two remote shutters to enable mirror lockup and bulb exposure on my Mamiya RZ67 pro II :smile:

    Never used that "feature" on my 1v yet ^^
     
  6. OldBodyOldSoul

    OldBodyOldSoul Member

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    Maybe that camera was meant to be used by the undead. They need no MLU as their hands are so still and strong that no vibration or 1/4s exposure will prevent them from making perfectly sharp images.
    Zombies are whole nother story, for them even 1/4000 is not enough.

    Just saying, you see to extract any useful info from that.
    And good luck!
     
  7. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    Good point about the F6. I've never used one but I just assumed it was well thought out. I'm used to the F3 and F4 which are super easy to use (although obviously much older than the EOS 1v).

    Incidentally, the mirror lockup function on a Leica R9 is pretty convoluted too.
     
  8. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Mirror lockup for the Nikon F6 is purely for avoiding mirror vibration. You turn the mode dial to MUP mode, press the release button once and the mirror goes up, press it another time the shutter is release and then the mirror goes down. 30 seconds after the shutter release is pressed the first time the shutter will goes if you don't press it a second time.
    It was not designed for using with old lenses that protrude into the mirror chamber like early F or F2.
     
  9. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Canon was obviously saving better implementation of MLU for
    drumrollllllll

    AN UPGRADE

    Too bad the film slr market died before that illustrious day.

    I don't own any of the newest Digi offerings from Canon but the menu option lives on into the II series Canon Digis.
     
  10. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    Hmmmm. OldBodyOldSoul. I'm guessing you're one of the former?
     
  11. Les Sarile

    Les Sarile Member

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    MLU on the EOS-3 and EOS-1V are as you say - embedded in the function. I never really thought of it as particularly clumsy in all the years I used it. However, now that I am immersed in pre AF cameras, I can see how adding it's own switch would make it more accessible.

    Would the Nikon F be the first 35mm SLR with MLU? It is certainly the goofiest MLU implementation I know of! It has it's own control that you turn but it won't raise the mirror at this time. You have to first advance and fire the shutter once at which time the mirror stays up so that it would be in the up position for the next time you advance and fire the shutter.

    The next goofiest MLU implementation I know of is the "unofficial" MLU on the Pentax MX. You advance the shutter and then "pop" the shutter release momentarily. This will raise the mirror and then after that you can just fire the shutter and the mirror would come back down as normal. This works on all of the MX's that I have owned (4) and other MX owners have also confirmed that this works the same for theirs too.

    The only other goofy MLU configuration I have is on the Pentax LX. It is straightforward enough as there is a control for it. However, this same lever activates MLU when turned one way but the same lever is used for the timer release when turned the other way. This arrangement means you can't use the timer and MLU at the same time.

    Otherwise, all the other bodies that I have with MLU are straight forward mechanical linkages that allows you to raise and lower the mirror at will.

    But of all the MLU capable bodies I have, I find the way Nikon FA, FM/FM2/FM3, FE/FE2 and even the cheapest FG implementation to be the best even though they don't have an independent MLU control. In these bodies, MLU is automatic when using the timer.
     
  12. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Much ado about nothing.
    You will also find MLU invaluable when using the TS-E 24mm F3.5L (I or II)!
    Cf 12 1 or 0 accomplishes MLU activation or deactivation. It's usefulness is doubled with 2 or 10sec self timer for remote photography or when commencing an invervalometric process like star trails. There is no sweat to on any of the Canons — it is that you have not warmed to idiosyncracies with Canon. All cameras have their own personalities. I've been using the 1N since 1996 and know all of the custom functions to memory.

    If you want it "up front and there to see", try the ginormous SLR-on-steroids Pentax 67 body with MLU. A tiny slider right side front mirror box engages with a gentle toot and the mirror's up (albeit draining the battery while you are procrastinating about a change in the scene before you...). With this beast, you need all the vibration dampening on offer, then some.
     
  13. j-dogg

    j-dogg Subscriber

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    I use an EOS system almost exclusively and the mirror lockup isn't a problem for me to engage, I'm just used to it.

    I guess if you are used to full manual 35mm cameras or some other system and switch to an EOS system it can be difficult. I've heard that from a lot of people who shot a different system then switched to an EOS, all other systems except for full manual feel alien to me.
     
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  15. Rol_Lei Nut

    Rol_Lei Nut Member

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    Many classic mechanical SLRs have the "unofficial" MLU. For sure I've it used on Pentax Spotmatics, Leicaflexes and Rolleiflex SL35s...

    Another "goofy" MLU is on the Pentax 6x7: while it does it's job as a MLU perfectly, I wish it *were* a little more fidgety as I set it off by accident quite often. :confused:
     
  16. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    It's a P.I.T.A., for sure. A tad easier on the digitals, as you don't have to memorize the function numbers, but a P.I.T.A. nonetheless. The only EOS cameras I'd suggest for mirror-up photography would be the EOS 1N-RS or the EOS RT. Both are incredibly cheap, and worth getting if you do that kind of shooting a lot. I'd get an RT for close ups, and use the 1V when you actually need autofocus and/or cannot afford the light loss of a pellicle mirror.

    The bright side of the Nikon F's MLU is that you can always compare the MLU shot to the non-MLU shot! :D
     
  17. JaZ99

    JaZ99 Member

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    I do own Pentax 67II and in my opinion it offers one of the best designed MLU function. If you have a metering prism (which is fantastic by the way) activating MLU activates exposition lock. So, you don't need to think about hardware, you can focus on the scene.

    And this beast can be operated handheld withoud MLU and you still can get razor sharp pictures. This one was shoot with 105 mm lens and 1/60s (no MLU of course):

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jaz99/6388272871/sizes/o/in/photostream/
     
  18. jrhilton

    jrhilton Member

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    Canon’s target market for the EOS-1v was sports shooters and photojournalists, both of which would not use MLU often. It is therefore of no surprise that it feels like an "afterthought" when using it. Overall it is still a great camera though.
     
  19. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    I am not sure but I don't think the Nikon F was the first with mirror lockup. MLU was popular back then and many cameras had this features. Only in modern time MLU became rare.
     
  20. Les Sarile

    Les Sarile Member

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    I haven't read of any other 35mm prior to the F with MLU. MLU couldn't have been popular then as there weren't many 35mm SLRs as the 35mm world was dominated by rangefinders that don't require MLU. The only other "professional" 35mm SLR at the time was the Canonflex and it doesn't seem to have MLU.
     
  21. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    Canon could have at least made the custom function buttons behind the side door a little bigger. Those things are tiny. Anyway at least I get to use the TSE II. I've been through my share of 24s over the years across several brands. The TSE II is the closest thing to perfect for me for an SLR 24mm. So it's worth the MLU hassle.
     
  22. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Again, just get an EOS RT for $70: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Canon-EOS-R...606725670?pt=Film_Cameras&hash=item2c610bd226. Well worth your money if you shoot macro that often.
     
  23. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    It's not macro/close up work I do. Mostly urban landscape/architectural. The fixed mirror thing always kind of bothered me as a concept. Wouldn't there be some sort of adverse effect on image quality?
     
  24. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    A great example of user-unfriendly design and narrow engineering point of view. Why an electronic mirror lockup, when a mechanical would be better?
     
  25. Rol_Lei Nut

    Rol_Lei Nut Member

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    So they could write "Ultra-Cybernetic Electronic Precision Mirror Raising - UCPMR" in their advertising brochures.

    I think some posters here would claim that would make the MLU more "accurate": a mechanical implementation not being accurate enough to be useful.... :whistling:
     
  26. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Yeah, like old clocks.. I mean, people didn't even know what time of year it was!