Canonet - Correct UV filter? mine blocks the light meter

Discussion in 'Rangefinder Forum' started by Bryan Murray, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. Bryan Murray

    Bryan Murray Member

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    I just picked up a Canonet QL17 III on ebay and I also went to BandH and picked up a UV filter. I didn't realize it when I bought it, but the metal part around the glass covers just a little bit of the built in light meter and throws off the exposure around 1 stop. I could just up my film speed, but I'm wondering if anyone has one of these cameras and knows the correct filter. The one I bought is a B+W brand. The metal ring does look maybe slightly bigger than most filters. I could try ordering some other ones but BandH only has that brand in stock.

    Anybody have one of these with a working filter? Would love to know what you use.
    Thanks!
     
  2. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    I can't answer your question specifically, but you can get "wide angle" filters (designed for use with wide angle lenses) that are much thinner. I think Heliopan made some, probably other brands as well.

    That might fix it.
     
  3. Xmas

    Xmas Member

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    Hi

    I'd not worry I use mine with a filter and hood to try and improve the metering contra jour, the alternative is tilting the camera down a bit, locking the meter needle by holding the shutter button part way until the shot is framed.

    A more annoying problem is you cannot obtain the mercury calls for the exposure meter. You need one of the silver cell adapters or a Shockley diode, or a hearing aid cell...

    I use mine manually most of the time.

    Noel.
     
  4. okto

    okto Member

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    The correct UV filter is a multicoated skylight filter. :tongue:
     
  5. BobD

    BobD Member

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    On my GIII I use a step-up ring from 48mm-49mm. This makes it a tad wider (which should clear the meter receptor) and also allows for the more common 49mm filters.
     
  6. Bryan Murray

    Bryan Murray Member

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    that's a good idea! thanks Bob :smile:
     
  7. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Member

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    And from the here's-another-possibly-useful-tip category,

    I also use that exact same step-up adapter so that I can attach the nice quality and very inexpensive Kalt 49mm lens hood. Here's a recent post of mine from the "Your most recent RF purchase" thread regarding Canonet QL17 G-III hoods.

    Ken
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 5, 2010
  8. Bryan Murray

    Bryan Murray Member

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    Ken have you tried the step-up ring / hood / with a UV filter as well? Is there any vignetting?
     
  9. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Member

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    Have not as yet tried that, no.

    I have a good collection of 52mm round filters courtesy of my manual focus Nikkor lenses. When I need a filter - usually for black-and-white contrast control - I use a 48-52mm step-up ring, the filter, and then attach a 52mm Nikon HS-11 hood.

    Unfortunately I don't own a 49mm filter of any type or I'd offer to try it out.

    One thing I have found, however, is that for accurate metering purposes it is necessary to always use a hood of some sort. The meter cell seems to have a fairly wide angle of acceptance, and being mounted right up front in the open, pointing the camera straight ahead and level will normally include too much bright sky. A hood mitigates this effect nicely.

    I had read somewhere else that the preferred third-party hood was the 48mm Hoya metal version. I waited six months for one to come up on The Auction Site and got it - together with a Hoya 48mm UV filter - for a very fair price. Not as deep and dark as the Kalt/step-up ring combination, but very compact for when that matters more.

    Ken
     
  10. Bryan Murray

    Bryan Murray Member

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    Cool, i went ahead and picked up all three at B and H today. So i'll try it out and see what happens. I think it's gonna work. I did notice that the meter changed slightly so maybe that will benefit the exposure. It's a really fun little camera. Thanks for the help!
     
  11. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Member

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    You're very welcome. Hope it works out.

    I picked up mine in almost perfect condition from another APUG subscriber ('davela' - an excellent seller) for a very reasonable price. I had never used any rangefinder before. It has since become my favorite 35mm camera. In fact, my current entry for the Blind Print Exchange #12 was made using it.

    Ken
     
  12. Bryan Murray

    Bryan Murray Member

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    well just my luck. got all the stuff and today the shutter stopped working. I called the nippon photo clinic and they told me to buy another camera. not worth fixing. Too late to send it back and I already gave positive feedback. It was working fine when I got it. Probably just dumb luck. I think i'm done with ebay.
     
  13. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Member

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    Try this...

    Set the unloaded camera near a source of heat and gently allow the lens barrel to warm up. When moderately warm to the touch, try running through all of the shutter speeds, including 'B'. Then try all of the other functions, such as aperture, shutter, focus, self-timer, film speed, film advance, rangefinder, etc.

    If the shutter and/or other functions show a noticeable improvement, then let the camera cool back down to room temperature. Try everything again. If the camera mostly reverts back to its previous state, then it's a pretty good bet that the 30- to 40-year old lubricants have stiffened and simply need to be replaced.

    If all of the camera's functions work correctly when warm, then nothing is truly broken and you have a good camera that only needs a CLA, with emphasis on the 'L'. My current understanding is that this service runs in the neighborhood of US$80-100. It would be up to you if that was worth it. But if you really like the camera...

    Ken
     
  14. Bryan Murray

    Bryan Murray Member

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    Yeah, at first the camera was firing a few seconds after pressing the button and this was outside in the cold. When I got to the subway it started working again fine. Then a little while later on the subway I checked it and it wasn't firing at all. It still isn't firing at all on any setting and it's definitely warmed up. Maybe something snapped inside.
     
  15. gb hill

    gb hill Member

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    I found a couple of 48mm uv filters for my Canonet. Never noticed any difference in my meters readings. I will have to check it out. I want to buy some more filters for the canonet. So B&H has the 48 to 49mm step up rings? I'll check it out.