cassettes

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by jim appleyard, Apr 18, 2005.

  1. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Does anyone know a source for GOOD reloadable cassettes? I bought some generic ones recently and the tops have a habit of popping off; not good!
     
  2. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

    Messages:
    4,049
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have been using Kalt brand for years with no problems, I know they are available through porters camera which if I remember right is www.porters.com

    Dave
     
  3. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks Dave. I had forgotten about the Kalt brand. They do make a good one.
     
  4. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

    Messages:
    3,242
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Location:
    Milwaukee, W
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I will second the vote on Kalt cassettes althought their spool is really flimsy.
     
  5. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I suppose I could rob the spool out the cheapies and put them in the Kalts.
     
  6. joeyk49

    joeyk49 Member

    Messages:
    1,325
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    New Jersey,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'll third(?) on the KALTs. Never a problem. They snap right on and pop off easily when you want them off.
     
  7. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,708
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2003
    Good Evening, Jim,

    I agree that the Kalt's are fine. I've never had a problem with the spools, but it's easy enough, if necessary, to salvage those from factory-loaded Kodak or Ilford cartridges.

    Konical
     
  8. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

    Messages:
    4,677
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Location:
    Italia
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I like the plastic ones with the screw in tops. The Kalts are fine but the screw tops are easier.
     
  9. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    How about the generic ones with the screw tops; anyone try/like those?
     
  10. eric

    eric Member

    Messages:
    1,586
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I just went through 10 of the plastic screw tops. I"ve had some fogging with them. YMMV. So try some.
    I saw, on BH, some VERY EXPENSIVE ones. Not sure if I will get them. But next time, I'll get the "snap top" ones.

    Best ones I've used, but not sold anymore, are the Kodak ones (metal)

    Some guy, on the RFF list, said he goes to the lab, they give him a handfull of old ones. They leave a piece sticking out and just tapes film to it, and then rolls it. Brilliant idea!
     
  11. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I could go to my lab too and I can try all of the above. I used to have some old Ilford ones, but they finally quit.

    Thanks all!
     
  12. BarrieB

    BarrieB Member

    Messages:
    110
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2003
    Location:
    Melbourne, A
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have tried the 'Plastic' screw end types and I put a spot on them each reload, I only get about 7 or 8 uses before getting some scratches on my films.
    * With my Bulk loader the film is not wound thro` the felt trap , however everytime a film is used it goes out once, rewind twice so my 8 times is really 16 times.
    Cheers BarrieB.
     
  13. Seele

    Seele Member

    Messages:
    194
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2004
    Location:
    Sydney Austr
    There is a good reason to hunt down those self-opening cassettes if your cameras take them, if your cameras are old enough of course!

    I use an alternative, however: the Shirley Wellard cassette, which is like any self-opening cassette, but works with any camera with a pull-up rewind knob. When it is loaded into the camera, the rewind know does not push all the way in but sticks out by about a millimetre or so. Push down the rewind knob and give it an anti-clockwise twist, it opens the cassette for easy egress and ingress of the film, and after rewind, push it down and give it another twist clockwise to close the cassette. Machined out of solid brass, Shirley Wellards are heavy... and heavy-duty, and last indefinitely too. They can still be found occasionally at camera collectors shows.
     
  14. Tach

    Tach Member

    Messages:
    61
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2004
    Location:
    Montevideo,
    Shooter:
    35mm
    That was me, but the idea is not mine; that´s just how everyone I know who uses bulk film reload cassettes down here... If I were to appear with store bought reloadable cassettes they'd smack me for having more money than sense.
     
  15. Daniel Lawton

    Daniel Lawton Member

    Messages:
    474
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I haven't had much luck with the plastic screw-top cassettes from B+H. Besides an occasional fogged edge, I have noticed tiny flecks of plastic inside the cassettes. Consequesntly I have been experiencing problems with scratches on some of my rolls. Once I finish them up I'll only use the metal Kalt cassettes. I haven't had any issues with those.
     
  16. Dr.Kollig

    Dr.Kollig Member

    Messages:
    107
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2004
    Location:
    Rhine valley
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    I found Kodak, Ilford and Fuji work well, but not Agfa and Tura. Some cassettes can still be opened like Efke, Foma, Lucky.

    So these days I days I use some cheap Ilford bulk in Lucky cassettes to look more professionell! :tongue:

    Plastic ones are not among my favourites, even if they still say Orwo NP 20, I used some tape to secure the top.

    Wolfram
     
  17. djklmnop

    djklmnop Member

    Messages:
    230
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2004
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I purchase the generic plastic screw-on ones from BH Photo. They can be tightened as much as you'd like without them breaking.. They are very unlikely to pop off as well. Pick up a semi-rough brush. I stick my thumb in the canister then flex my thumb to separate the leaders so I can brush the dust off after each use. They say the life of these canisters are about 10 rolls refills.. I've used mines for over 5 years without running into a single scratch. Just be sure to brush to keep them dust-free.
     
  18. gbroadbridge

    gbroadbridge Member

    Messages:
    371
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2004
    Location:
    Sydney, Aust
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I just use good quality plastic screw top cassettes from a local supplier (Vanbar).

    I bought 5 a couple of years ago, which must have had 100 loads of film each through them by now and I've never seen a neg scratch (but I admit to only loading film in protected places like in the car - I'd never open the camera in a sandstorm :smile:.

    I just blow them out using compressed air before each load. I've had ONE incident of the top unscrewing itself and that was just carelessness on my part.


    Graham.
     
  19. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    9,281
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2002
    Location:
    Bergen, Norw
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    When I last used a bulkloader - which I admit is quite a few years ago - I would get used AGFA, Fuji and Ilford cassettes. By holding them in one hand and slamming the projecting part of the spindle HARD down on a firm surface, the lid would pop off. Agfa cassettes were the best for some reason, but only used with a Fuji lid! The original lids tended to pop off at awkward times. I would use a cassette three or four times, then discard it (and keep the lid if it was still good).