Changing Deardorff Backs

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Mahler_one, Dec 20, 2008.

  1. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    Before deciding upon the purchase of a 4x5/5x7 back for my 8x10 Deardorff, I wonder if anyone might comment on the ease of changing from one back to another. Are there any "tips" to make the change between backs easier? When buying a used reducing back are there any faults to be especially aware of? I thank you in advance for any advice and counsel.

    Ed
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 20, 2008
  2. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    If they are real Deardorff backs, and the camera hasn't been 'improved',
    it is no different than reversing your 8x10 back. Lift the tabs with your thumbs,
    lift the back off, and replace it. Takes 5 seconds.
     
  3. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    Thanks much...seemed that easy, but one never knows.

    Ed
     
  4. climbabout

    climbabout Member

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    deardorff backs

    Sometimes the retaining pins on older backs get worn and driven in too far to hold the back on properly. There's a fellow who routinely sells replacements on e*b*y - he sells them in the original length and also a slightly longer version - I just replaced mine and the back now snaps on like the day it left the factory.
    Tim
     
  5. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    Thanks Tim...I noted the same items. If one has a reducing back..or even entertains the thought of getting one...then one should consider keeping the pins on hand.

    Ed
     
  6. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    It really isn't an issue if you are starting with a new camera.
    After YEARS of use, it won't be a problem.

    BUT lots of the cameras that have come into the market over the past 15 years
    have served in catalog houses where they were worked VERY hard.

    Like buying a retired Checker,
    the previous owner might have put some serious mileage on your camera.
     
  7. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    How many really know what a retired Checker is df?! :} We must both be from some bygone era....those cars ran forever.
     
  8. John Kasaian

    John Kasaian Member

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    I've ridden in Checkers lots of times---probably one of the most comfortable back seats ever built in the US.

    The pride of Kalamazoo:smile:

    Whittlesea in Reno Nevada had a fleet of them in the 70's--I wonder where they were all all retired to?
     
  9. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    Ah yes John...the famed back seat of the Checkers...before the age of motels...

    Ed