CHeck for fogging

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by mark, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. mark

    mark Member

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    If I want to check for fogging in some old film would I expose it then develope it, or would developing unexposed film work?
     
  2. Kevin Kehler

    Kevin Kehler Member

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    Develop unexposed film. If it is fogged, once developed and fixed, it will not be clear but more of a foggy/misty look.
     
  3. mark

    mark Member

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    Thanks.
     
  4. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    Keep in mind that some films are not entirely clear after processing. Some have a rather high base+fog and it shows.

    Check for evenness as well as fog.
     
  5. mark

    mark Member

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    Had not thought of that. I was planning to develop a sheet and drop it onto a white piece of paper. It was my understanding that films fog from the out in. Is this correct? I had not thought about general base+ fog. I don't have anything to compare this too. I am looking at some couple year out of date Delta 100, Efke 100, and really old JC 200. Are these noted for high Base+fog?
     
  6. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    Not so much the Delta, but the other two might be, the jc is probably foma, I'm sure someone will correct me if Im mistaken.

    If it's heat fog, it may move from out to in, but if its fog from gamma radiation, it may not be. But... if the fog is even, its of little consequence you will be able to a certain degree compensate and print through it.

    You can also add 5ml of a 5% benzotriazole solution (per liter of developer) to reduce the fogging.

    Considering the cost of having film one can't trust, why anyone does this with old film, I just cant say.

    If it's found film that has been exposed that might be a different matter.

    Regardless, best of luck.
     
  7. mark

    mark Member

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    Those were my sentiments a couple of years ago. Due to circumstances beyond my control we had to move 5 years ago to a place I never wanted to be, to run a business I never wanted to run, and was working two full time jobs for three years. I wanted to photograph, I had ideas, I bought the film, and took a head first dive into a deep depression. I just walked away from the cameras and film. Left them where they were.

    While the situation has not changed my attitude has and I have a couple hundred dollars in out of date poorly stored film. I hate the idea of tossing something that might be good. If it is not good I toss it. If it is good I use it.
     
  8. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    Best of luck with a difficult situation then, Mark.

    Let me know if I can help.
     
  9. Xmas

    Xmas Member

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    Shoot the first of each film type on repeatable shots, e.g. local scenery, use a low fog developer for 20% less time than recommended on box. Even if it fogs badly if it is uniform you can print though. The effective film speed will be reduced if it has bad fog as the (ISO) film speed is density above the fog/base level. Try 1/3 of a stop more exposure, initially.

    Note Rodinal and Microphen seem reasonable for fog level although they are quite active...

    Noel
     
  10. Xmas

    Xmas Member

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    Shoot it at 1/3 of a stop more exposure, in case it is fogged. If the fogging is uniform you can print through it no problem, but the shadows may be under the fog density level hence the 1/3 of a stop more exp. Use 20% less time in developer, if you are [bad word] scanning [/bad].

    Noel