Chemical Storage...

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by tonyjuliano, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. tonyjuliano

    tonyjuliano Member

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    I just added a post to my Blog that tackles the very exciting subject (sarcasm intended) of how to store photo related chemicals.

    You can read all about it here...
     
  2. Puma

    Puma Member

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    Thank you, I appreciate this. I've been trying to figure out how to set up my darkroom and air evac bottles are always out of stock, I don't know exactly what sizes to get? Because funds are limited and I don't know what I'm doing I don't want to make buying mistakes. Where do you find marbles and is there any danger of cracking the bottom of the glass when dropping them in?

    Sincerely,

    Puma
     
  3. Puma

    Puma Member

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    32 ounce bottles are also out of stock from the site you recommended.
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Brown bottles are not needed! After all, how long is it light in your darkroom or storage area, and how bright are the lights, particularly in the uv....

    Also, with Jobo plastic containers, I have been able to keep partially full bottles of developers for up to 6 months or even longer.

    We used clear glass for many processing solutions at Kodak.

    PE
     
  5. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    Specialty bottle.com. Best $200 I ever spent for my dark room. They clean and you can see if they are clean. Air Evac are worthless. Cap is bad. Collects dirt you can not see.

    Buy one time use size for developer. Say 4 oz for D76 + 4 oz water. Get twice the caps you need and the ones with conical inserts that seal. Wipe the lip dry before capping.

    Glass is 100% better than any plastic. Old beer bottles work fine if you get good caps.
     
  6. Ottrdaemmerung

    Ottrdaemmerung Member

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    I've only started doing my own developing a year ago so I'm by no means an expert in chemical storage, but I'm really liking Datatainer brown plastic bottles in the 1 qt. and 1 gal. sizes. I use the gal. for mixing up and storing powders like D-76, and the qt. for stop, fix, and each of the chemicals in my C-41 kits. The 1 qt. have clear measuring stripes along one side but the other sizes do not. I've yet to have any trouble with them and I label the fronts and the caps to prevent cross-contamination.
     
  7. tonyjuliano

    tonyjuliano Member

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    If you are using them for long term storage, you will sooner than later have oxidation issues with the Datatainer vessels.

    Especially with the C-41 stuff, trust me.
     
  8. Ottrdaemmerung

    Ottrdaemmerung Member

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    Thanks for the advice, Tony. I'm only using them for C-41 working solutions so I exhaust them faster than they can oxidize; and I've only had to keep D-76 for a few months. I'll buy some of the amber glass ones for longer term storage, thanks!
     
  9. Diapositivo

    Diapositivo Subscriber

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    I have just begun. I keep things simple. I keep all E6 chemistry in their original plastic containers, I prepare solutions one-shot, which I actually use twice, within one day. I then use Tetenal Protectan Spray on all original flasks of chemistry. I could use it only for developers, I use it for all baths out of pure paranoia.

    I like one-shot use. Results are repeatable, and unused chemistry is kept undiluted, which helps preservation. Antioxidant is an added layer of protection. And much less fixer sniffing, I presume.

    Don't store your chemistry where it is too cold. For my E6 it is recommended to avoid temperatures below 13 °C.

    Fabrizio
     
  10. Puma

    Puma Member

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    Ronald will you tell me the complete sizes that you found most useful. I think that the specialtybottle.com is the wisest route to go, I just don't know about the practical sizes for each. I mix developer one shot but reuse everything else to maximize my economy.

    Thank you,

    Justin
     
  11. tonyjuliano

    tonyjuliano Member

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  12. b.cipolla

    b.cipolla Member

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    Specialty Bottle looks like a really great site. I couldn't believe how cheap the bottles were! However, I'm trying to find a bottle just like the amber Boston Rounds, but in a 1 L size. They have 32 oz but that still is a little small for the batches of chemicals I'm mixing. Does anyone have any recommendations?
     
  13. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    Mixed D-76 by the gallon I pour into old rinsed out yeast bottles from our bread making efforts. They are wide mouth amber glass, and have a coated metal cap with a great rubber gasket, and hold 225ml. This I dilute 1+1 to process a 35mm film. I always give excess d-76 1+1 when processing small quantities.

    I stick to 250mL ( pmk concentrate A, 2 B's), and 500mL for things like storing seasoned developer, and used to use them for e-6 500mL kits. Now I keep mixed replenisher solutions in 500mL.

    1L/32oz bottles are the most popular for my c-41 mixes, since I tend to mix it and temper it 1L at a time.

    Print developers I tend to store in 3.8 or 4.55L 'wine jug' type of containers under the sink. If I could find a source for more 1.5-2L glass bottles I would be happy.

    I am just getting started with a 4x5 sink line for e-6 and would love to find 1.5L bottles, because that is about the least amount of solution the old Kodak hard rubber tanks can take and still be sure the hangers are fully immersed.
     
  14. GeorgesGiralt

    GeorgesGiralt Member

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    Hello !
    Your post is good but needs a couple of comments.
    Storing chemicals in a fridge is, generally, a bad idea as some times the mix broke and you get solid deposit in the bottom of the vessel. And morer often than not, they can't be brought back into solution... want to know how I learned it ?
    The use of marbles is, at first, a good idea, but when they age, they tend to produce very small chis which could ruin the wonderful and perfect shot which will make you rich....
    I've a better solution altogether which is better explained by an example :
    Suppose you've a one gallon D76 stock batch freshly mixed. Suppose you need 150 CC of stock to process one film at 1+1 dilution because your tank need 300 CC chemistry to wet one 135/36 film. Buy a set of 150 cc glass bottles and 3 one liter glass bottles.
    Measure 150cc D76 and put it in one 150 cc bottle. There is a certain amount of air above the chemistry. Fill this up to the brim with plain water, cap tightly and label as 150 CC stock D76 with the date mixed. Your bottle contains exactly 150 CC D76 and, of course, an unknown amount of water. When preparing the working solution for your film, put the entire content of the bottle into the measuring cylinder, add water to get up to the 300 CC mark and, voila ! You've got 300 CC D76 at 1+1 dilution. This way, your chemistry will last for a very long time provided your darkroom does not get ice cold in winter and oven hot in summer....
    Generally, I put my developer in 1 liter bottles filled to the brim and the remaining from the gallon in the little 150cc bottles. (the 3.76 L D76 stock is split in 3 one liter bottles and the remaining of the 76 liter stock divided in 150 CC). When the set of small doses are finished, I split another liter into small 150CC bottles in the same way...
    Hope this helps.
     
  15. Puma

    Puma Member

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    Out of the frustration of not ever finding suitable containers in stock I went another route by going to the liquor. And buying Fischer and Grolsch swingtop beer bottles. I mix my chemistry stock and divide it into several bottles. For film development I also use the Grolsch bottles for my film development. I think these swingtops are the best solution possible. Plus you get to drink the beer that comes in them!

    -puma
     
  16. b.cipolla

    b.cipolla Member

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  17. kb3lms

    kb3lms Subscriber

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    Looks like a nice idea! Google "swing top bottles" and you can find some that are a bit less expensive in imperial measurements - 16 and 32 oz. Are people having success with these?
     
  18. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Bottles made from one of the following plastics also provide very good protection against oxidation. These are polyethylene terphthalate PETE and polyvinyl chloride PVC. These materials can be identified from the SPI number inside the recycle triangle. PETE is SPI = 1 and PVC is SPI = 3.

    Glass has two disadvantages; it breaks easily and it is heavy. Once you have had to clean up a darkroom spill caused by a broken bottle you may be more apt to choose plastic. Weight for glass containers makes them more expensive to ship. The best solution is to buy special "unbreakable" glass bottles. These are coated with an outside plastic layer. The glass may break but the bottle will hold its shape and contents. Unfortunately they are expensive.

    The best solution to the oxidation problem is to mix up small amounts of developers and to use up solutions promptly. Stop bath, fixer, and solutions other than developers can be stored any type container.
     
  19. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I hear about the benefit of amber bottles but who stores chemicals in well-lit environment in the first place? I store all of mine in my darkroom, under the counter, in a plastic tub. As a result, the bottle stays in dark environment until it's ready to be used.

    I use plastic bottles. I also hear about plastic letting oxygen in. That may be true but my developers have lasted well over advertised 6 months. Do plastic let in sufficient amount to actually cause damage? All liquid stock solutions are sold in plastic and unopened, they last several years at least. (granted thick stock solutions are less affected).

    I really doubt these measures are really necessary. I store my developers in clear plastic bottles that are 250cc in size. I do that because each bottle then is a "bite size". They are convenient and not exposed to air until needed. I buy them at less than a dollar each from Amazon.

    It's been working for me very VERY well.
     
  20. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    500ml water bottles from the grocery store, PETE plastic, you can squeeze the air out, RA4 paper developer easily lasts for 6 months in them without visible oxidation, cheap, like $4.00 for 36 on sale and they come complete with drinking water. :smile:
     
  21. AlbertZeroK

    AlbertZeroK Member

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    I can't use glass bottles. I'll break them. They do have plastic covered glass bottles which don't shatter. But for me, I don't keep mixed up chemistry around for long. And I tend to use one shot solutions either HC110 or Rodinal for black and white which can be kept in concentrate on the shelf.