Chemigrams/chromoskedasics

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by polli, Nov 10, 2002.

  1. polli

    polli Member

    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2002
    I am wanting to contact anyone who has tried painting photochemicals onto black and white paper to produce colours.

    In particular i am looking for a copy of Scientific American November 1991
    It had an article by Dominic Lam on Chromoskedasic Painting

    Can anyone help????

    Polli

    dawntreaderbus@yahoo.com
     
  2. edbuffaloe

    edbuffaloe Member

    Messages:
    132
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2002
    Location:
    Austin, Texa
    I have tried the chromoskedasic pseudosolarization process, which uses various color processing chemicals, but I was not pleased with the results. William Jolly published a couple of articles about the process in Darkroom and Creative Camera Techniques magazine a number of years ago, which is where I heard about it. He claimed it worked best on RC papers, which I refuse to use.

    You should be able to find the Scientific American article in any large library collection.
     
  3. edbuffaloe

    edbuffaloe Member

    Messages:
    132
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2002
    Location:
    Austin, Texa
    I located the magazine with William Jolly's first article on chromoskedasic duotone pseudosolarization: November/December 1992, page 30. He refers to an article in the November 1991 issue of Scientific American by Dominic Lam and Bryant Rossiter, stating: "The method involves the application of Kodak S2 Activator (a dilute potassium hydroxide solution), Kodak Ektamatic S30 Stabilizer (an acetate-buffered thiocyanate solution), and Dektol to the resin-coated papers, Kodak Polycontrast III RC F and Kodabrome. The colors are due to extremely finely divided silver particles in the photographic emulsions." Jolly worked out a method of using the chemicals to make duotone prints that look as if they are solarized. He published another article in a later issue expanding on his first one.