Chlorophyll Photography!

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by lynettemax, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. lynettemax

    lynettemax Member

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    Hey everyone,
    I just stumbled on the website a few weeks ago. The idea of printing a photo on a leaf is so interesting to me. I gave it a shot myself and I have had no luck...
    I was just wondering if anyone has had any luck with this and if there are any tips out there to help me out!

    http://www.npr.org/programs/talkingplants/features/2003/danh/index.html

    Lynette
     
  2. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Well, the article does say that it takes days, and even weeks sometimes, and he checks it periodically. Have you let it sit long enough? Maybe a very contrasty negative, and a grow lamp.
     
  3. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    The other side of this is to feed a leaf with a small injection of a staining dye, and watch it work its way though the leaf's vascular system.

    I'm no biologist, but have a ton of chems given to me that I am working though figuring out how to use them , and I am sure one of the biological stains would be suited to this task.

    Now to just find the time to persue this idea as well.
     
  4. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    Anthotypes are arguably the oldest form of photographic prints.

    It's not archival, but you can do it and get good results. In addition to direct leaf prints, you can also extract the pigments from green or red leaves or flowers and coat those onto paper and do it that way.

    A noted modern practitioner of leaf printing is Bin Danh.
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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  6. lynettemax

    lynettemax Member

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    I figured I would have to manipulate the leaf at some point. I thing I am going to try blue food dye, just because I have some at the house. Hopefully it works out, if not try try and try again.
    Thanks!
     
  7. nateblake666

    nateblake666 Member

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    I know it's now November and this was first posted in April, but a few days ago Bin Dahn gave a lecture at UNC-Greensboro about his process and resolved images. Chlorophyll Prints are not the same as Anthotypes.

    Bin Dahn's Chlorophyll Print process is fairly simple, but people rarely are able to execute the process to its fullest potential because of the amount of time it requires.

    Also, please note that it might be necessary to print place and clip the negative to a live plant and expose it to the sun directly. The leaf has to be able to breathe. Bin Dahn uses unclipped leaves and clipped leafs, but either way the photosynthesis process has to be continuous during the print process. Note again, that the type of leaf will make the difference. A flatter leaf requires slightly more loose clamping and allows the plant to use the photosynthesis process more efficiently.

    Bin Dahn uses resin to preserve the process.

    I must stress that this process is in service of the image at all steps. It's not like willy nilly print on a leaf.
     
  8. Maris

    Maris Member

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    There is actually a development step possible to speed up leaf photography.

    The first step is a long exposure with a high contrast negative pressed to the leaf. Then the leaf is picked and boiled in alcohol (care, fire hazard) to dissolve out the chlorophyll. Next is a soak in a dilute iodine solution. A blue toned image appears.

    What happens is that the illuminated portions of the leaf carry out photosynthesis which culminates in the production of microscopic starch grains. The iodine-starch complex is the blue stuff making up the image.
     
  9. lica3

    lica3 Member

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    I am trying to figure out a faster way of doing the Chlorophyll process? What is the dilute iodine solution? I would like to try this.
     
  10. Maris

    Maris Member

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    The iodine I used was a few drops of tincture of iodine (from the local pharmacy) in water so that the solution looks slightly yellowish.
     
  11. eleonora

    eleonora Member

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    Hello everyone!
    Very nice the way to print you mentioned before (the one with alcohol) I tried to do it at home but nothing...
    Maris could you repeat it more exactly?
    Thanks