Chris Honeysett

Discussion in 'Photographers' started by brYan, Jan 12, 2003.

  1. brYan

    brYan Subscriber

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  2. Nige

    Nige Subscriber

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    well worth a browse!
     
  3. lee

    lee Member

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    I agree very nice work. I have had him bookmarked for a little while and I used to look at the web site often. Not so much now.

    lee\c
     
  4. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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  5. William Levitt

    William Levitt Member

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    Thanks guys, both of the links show some fine images. I must admit to having a difficult time determining wether or not the film used to create those images is infra red or not. When I see leaves that seem to glow, I assume it's due to the use of IR film, or did the photographer create this effect through wise use of filters and printing skills?
     
  6. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    From what I understand Rosenstock does not use IR film. There is a lot of printing skills in his prints. I am sure he uses bleach and masks etc.
     
  7. Aggie

    Aggie Member

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    ..
     
  8. William Levitt

    William Levitt Member

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    Yes, I've used green filters and also yellow/green filters, but have never achieved foliage that was THAT "white". Actually, the closet I ever came to something like that was using an orange filter with fall foliage.

    The amount of manipulation is certainly evident in both photographers work, but in both cases I find their restraint comendible, and their skill impressive. It goes to show you there are advantages and diadvantges to every film format. Try getting those kinds of reults (speaking of burning and dodging) while contact printing. Nothing like a nicely projected negative to allow for precise control as far as the darkroom manipulations are concerned.
     
  9. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    I agree with William I have tried the green and yellow/green filters and had moderate success. Always had to bleach or intensify the neg, or use a mask.
     
  10. Les McLean

    Les McLean Subscriber

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    Try under exposing the film by 1 stop with the green filter in place and over develop the film by two stops. This will have the effect of increasing the density of the negative in the highlights which will increase the contrast and help produce brighter whites in the final print especially if you use grade 4 or even 5. The reason for underexposing is to compensate in the shadows for the extra development. You are likely to see some increase in grain but this will help produce the grainy effect of IR film.
     
  11. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    Thanks Les, that is a good idea I will give it a shot.
     
  12. brYan

    brYan Subscriber

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    William...

    Chris Honeysett uses FP4+ in PMK.
     
  13. David Hall

    David Hall Member

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    Both are great. And I agree with the earlier comment that the photographers are to be commended for using restraint with their manipulation.

    Honeyset's work is especially interesting to me, as I seem to have a hard time getting fog to appear interesting in any way in my work. It dulls for me, where as it seems to brighten for him. Maybe there's a technique like what Les described for foliage earlier. Any thoughts?

    Anyway, thanks for the links.

    dgh