cibachrome vs. fujiflex

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by allsystemsfail, Mar 9, 2011.

  1. allsystemsfail

    allsystemsfail Member

    Messages:
    65
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Anyone know if fujiflex will be as stable as cibachromes over time?
     
  2. nickrapak

    nickrapak Member

    Messages:
    750
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    No. Someone will be along to explain better than I can, but a major part of the image stability of Ilfochrome/Cibachrome comes from both the high-purity Azo dyes embedded in the paper as well as the dye-destruction based P-5 process.
     
  3. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,066
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Ilfochrome/Cibachrome is not coated on paper. It is a white Melinex (DuPont's trade name for poyester).

    EDIT: Apparently there is a resin coated paper version too: http://www.firstcall-photographic.co.uk/userfiles/file/ilfochrome.pdf


    Steve.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 10, 2011
  4. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

    Messages:
    4,423
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2009
    Location:
    Rochester NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yep, Ilfo/Cibachrome is in a class by itself.

    Dye-destruction, silver-dye-bleach processes are fundamentally different than color-coupler, chromogenic prints.

    That's not to say that the latter's stability will be bad, but the former's stability is fantastic.
     
  5. nickrapak

    nickrapak Member

    Messages:
    750
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I know it's not coated on paper, but "paper" is the common term for photographic printing material. Besides, the OP was comparing two polyester-base printing materials, so I assume he would know what I was referring to.