Cleaning lenses

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by FrankB, Jun 25, 2004.

  1. FrankB

    FrankB Member

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    I've just picked up my new spectacles and also got some liquid Coated Lens Cleaner. The little pump spray says "Cleans all coated and multicoated optical lenses" and "Non-toxic, anti-static formula, contains no alcohol or solvents".

    So I thought, hmmmm....!

    Up until now I've been using a lens pen (wonderful gadget, highly recommended!) but I wondered if this stuff would:

    1) Be safe to use on my Nikkors (fnar!)

    2) Give any better results

    What do you reckon?

    All the best,

    Frank
     
  2. jim kirk jr.

    jim kirk jr. Member

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    IMO using anthing that can get inside the les itself(liquids,etc.)is always risky and I tend not to use anything more than a lens cloth(without anything on it).If it really needs cleaning you may want to see how much it costs to get professional cleaned rather than ruin a lens.
     
  3. jim kirk jr.

    jim kirk jr. Member

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    I'm sorry Frank-I just re-read your question.I thought you meant lenses-as for eyeglasses I'm not sure-you can always check withthe nearest eyeglaases place to make sure it won't harm your script.
     
  4. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Lens Cleaning...

    Of all the saddest things of mice or men ... the saddest are these ... the lenses that have been massacred by constant, knee-jerk cleaning.
    Occasionally,one comes across them in the "Used" areas, Beautiful Leica and Hasselblad lenses - with a central, translucent spot...

    I worked, in a different life, for a company involved in the production of *Highly* sophisticated optics. I saw one on-the-spot firing: against all his training, this guy "cleaned" a lens he thought to be "dirty" with a pencil eraser. This lens was one with a special - I think it was eight- layer coating, which was immediately destroyed.

    My best cleaning advice is **DON'T**!!. It takes a LOT of "dirt" to affect lens performance. What will be impacted most is contrast. If at all possible DON'T clean that lens!! Whatever - "Pens", "Miracle Cloths" - Grinding Wheels and Drano - comes in contact with that lens (actually the coating - much softer than the glass itself is most vulnerable), will have an adverse effect - to some degree.
    Put "UV" or "Clear" (there's a difference?) filters on the lens, and leave it there wherever possible. Clean the filter if you must - even the most expensive Heliopan is less "dear" than the lens.

    We were allowed the use of *one* "system" - distilled water and surgical cotton - with *no* pressure on the cotton. If that did not remove whatever was on the lens - it went to Technicians specifically trained in cleaning - which was most of the time, anyway.
     
  5. FrankB

    FrankB Member

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    Jim, you read it right the first time; I did mean my camera lenses. Good point, well made.

    Ed, All my lenses wear Hoya HMC Skylight 1B's (almost as clear as UV's, but with a little added warmth which I find pleasing) and the only time they ever come off is to gently flick away dust particles (how the *heck* do they get in there?!) with a very soft brush.

    You are of course right. Let's put this down to a temporary aberration on my part and move along!

    Thanks

    Frank