Cleaning up stuff after development?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by awaken77, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. awaken77

    awaken77 Member

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    How do you clean bottles and other containers after storing photo chemicals?
    I use dishwashing aids, but not sure, if it capable to dissolve residue from some chemicals completely.
    Same question applied to kitchen sink and other places, where chemicals can be spilled during development
     
  2. CPorter

    CPorter Member

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    Very hot water has always worked for me in rinsing out bottles. When I'm totally done with my kitchen sink, I will use a basic kitchen cleaner to wipe down the sink and the counter top.
     
  3. justpete

    justpete Subscriber

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    Tide is an old lab standby for cleaning glassware, doesn't take much and leaves glass squeaky clean. Be sure to rinse several times with very hot water and then you can use distilled water for a final rinse so there won't be any spots when they dry.
     
  4. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    Your greatest aid to clean containers is clear
    glass or plastic. Glass will remain clear after years
    of use. Plastics?

    I stocked up on amber glass Boston Rounds years ago
    and have not looked for anything else since. They are
    a standard for chemical storage. They are available
    wide & narrow mouth with a variety of caps and
    lids, amber or colorless. They are inexpensive.

    In brief, start your cleanup with easy to clean totaly
    transparent containers. A few changes of warm tap
    water does it for me. A few harmless water spots
    is all I'm left with. Dan
     
  5. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    If you rinse them out with warm water and don't let any crud accumulate, there's no problem. If you don't, there is. Simple.
     
  6. Stew

    Stew Member

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    That's what I do.
     
  7. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    ***********

    Ditto.
     
  8. craigclu

    craigclu Subscriber

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    I got accustomed to using this at the lab at work and find that it works very well and rinses especially clean.

    http://tinyurl.com/47fd73


     
  9. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    I'm part of the just rinse crowd. If you have a bottle, only used for developer, for example; then there's nothing that needs to be "washed" with anything other than water. For surfaces, I do the same, wipe everything down with a damp sponge, several times. As Frank notes, If nothing is allowed to build up, then water will care of any cleaning for most processes.
    If a fixer spot shows up on some wall or a counter someplace then it's a sign that the wiping down wasn't complete.

    For me, no photo chemistry in the kitchen, ever.
     
  10. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    rinse and then the heavy duty approach

    Rinse its the first line of defense. Rinse as soon as you are no longer keeping the chem in the bottle.

    I second the amber Boston rounds recommendation for developers.

    Some packaged kitchen sauces - like Dianna sauce- a BBQ sauce in Canada - is sold in a 500mL clear glass bottle with a narrow top, and a nice well fitting lid. I use them for weird solutions, like intensifiers and clearing baths, HCA concentrate, etc., as well as for different stock solutions, like for bromide and carbonate for tweaking the action of paper developers.

    Yeast bottles for the bread machine or home baker are wide mouth amber glass, with a gasketted sealed metal lid, and work perfectly for storing exactly the amount of developer used for a single reel when using stainless steel reels.

    I use cheaper bottles for fixer - actually usually green 2L 'sprite' bottles with their original label removed, since when a fixer gets old and sulfates out it is not worth it in my eyes trying to clean the bottle.

    I use color coded PVC electrical tape in various colours from a dollar store to label the bottles. It does not come off if the bottles are immersed in a water bath.

    I write on the tape with a sharpie marker- again - water proof. I record: Name of chemistry, reference to formula location if I have mixed from scratch, and I keep a running tally of how many times I have used the solution, if I reuse the solution.

    From this habit I have learned, for instance, that E6 bleach, used for e-6 or c-41 is good for about 25 rolls per L before its action begins to slow. Similarly, c41 fixer is good for about 15 rolls before it starts to take too long to clear.

    I keep bottles and lids that have held a solution labeled as so (white bits of tape) bleach (yellow tape) fix (blue tape) stop bath (red tape) and stabilizer (green tape), and try not to mix them up the next time I use them.

    Sometimes a rinse does not clean the bottle, and kitchen or laundry cleaners will not clean then either. Bottles that have held C41 bleach is one example.

    In these cases I get out the lab coat, rubber gloves and goggles, and then get concentrated sulphuric acid out. 800ml or hot water, 10mL of sulphuric, added slowly with stirring, then poured into the stained bottle. Gentle shaking with the bottle cap held on loosely gets rid of stains around the bottle cap as well. Rinse well with plenty of water after this treatment.
     
  11. crispinuk

    crispinuk Member

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    Any fixer splashes quickly corrode my (not very) stainless steel sink. I've found the 'cream cleaner' type kitchen cleaner (The 'premium' brand is Cif (what was wrong with Jif?) in Europe, it's the chalky Scours Without Scratching! stuff) is very effective if used at the end of each session. I'm not sure if it's due to the calcium carbonate in the cleaner neutralising the acid in the fixer ('O' level chemistry was a long time ago), or just that the white chalky residue left behind if you don't thoroughly rinse down means bits don't get missed.