Cloudy Componon-S

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by wilsonneal, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. wilsonneal

    wilsonneal Member

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    I have a fairly new (modern composite barrel) Schneider Componon 50mm enlarging lens that looks cloudy/foggy. This haze will not come off with cleaning, so it seems it's on internal elements. I see a retaining ring front and rear that holds elements in place. Has anyone ever taken one of these apart and successfully put it back together or is this better left to a repair service? Any recommends on affordable lens cleaning service? Would have to consider cost of cleaning versus replacing. It seems that darkroom gear is getting so inexpensive it may not make sense to clean this lens.

    Thanks
    Neal
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    In the past I have seen condensation in my Componons, this can leave a cloudy film when it dries.

    I don't keep my lenses in my darkroom, any more, as in the summer on hot humid days the damp warm air percolates into the darkroom and into the lenses. Should add my darkrooms in my cellar so always cool. Condensation in the lenses has been a problem in the past. My Componon elements unsrewed with ease and so I could clean them.

    Ian
     
  3. Petzi

    Petzi Member

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    Do not take the lens apart. You can unscrew the lens elements from the barrel though. If that does not help, Call Schneider Optics. The repair might not cost you much. You can be sure the lens is assembled correctly.
     
  4. wilsonneal

    wilsonneal Member

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    cloudy componon

    How do you unscrew the lens elements without taking the lens apart? Sorry, I am confused. Thanks
    N
     
  5. rbarker

    rbarker Member

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    I think he means don't go farther than removing the front and rear element assemblies. That's easy to do, and allows you to clean the inner surfaces.
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Just looked at my Componon S lenses and all you need to do unscrew the rear assembly to clean, any more should definately be left to experts. Just tried and the block will unscrew with ease. My problem with condensation was with older Componon lenses.

    In reality though it's far cheaper to buy a 2nd hand mint enlarger lens off the auction site than have one serviced and cleaned.

    Ian
     
  7. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    wilsonneal,
    As they say "it ain't rocket science" As long as you are careful to reassemble the lens in the correct sequence youu'll have no problem.
    The retaining ring you saw holds the elements in place. Remove it using a spanner or ground down long nose plier & the elements will drop right out.
    I use a small suction cup to extract them.
    Make sure you don't flip any elements over when reassembleing the lens & you'll be in like Flynn.
    As an aside, the barrels are machined to very precise dimensions, as are the elements, so it just requires a modicum of care in reassembly.
    P.S.
    There's no rotational alignment involved in the lens. Go for it.
     
  8. voceumana

    voceumana Member

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    Try putting it in a glass jar, and throw in a few silca gel packets (dessicant). If it is condensation, then the dessicant will absorb the humidity over time, and de-fog it.

    It might take a week or so.

    Don't keep enlarging lenses in the darkroom; always store them with a dessicant packet if you live in a humid area. I'm in San Francisco Bay area (always humid), and have saw a used Leica camera and lenses with with fungus inside. Without humidity, the fungus can't grow, so play it safe.

    Charlie
     
  9. antielectrons

    antielectrons Inactive

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    I had the same issue with a componon-s. Sent it to scheider who wanted $300 to put it right. I ended up getting a Meopta meogon instead.
     
  10. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Well many of the Meopta lenses are actually made by Scheider, so thats a very good option, and the Meogons have an excellent reputation.

    Ian
     
  11. Petzi

    Petzi Member

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    That's weird. I have a Componon-S lens that had been damaged by frost. Schneider repaired it for less than a hundred Euros and they had to disassemble the entire lens.
     
  12. antielectrons

    antielectrons Inactive

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    I dont know what "frost damage" is, but fungus cannot be repaired and requires new lens elements.
     
  13. Petzi

    Petzi Member

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    I am not deep into the details of lens engineering, but there appears to be some kind of lacquer on the rim of each lens element. This was apparently damaged when I stored the lens in a very humid place over the winter. The damage was visible from the outside, it looked a bit like bubbles at the rim of the lenses. I don't think it affected the optical performance, but I had Schneider repair it anyway. Schneider disassembled the lens and re-applied the lacquer. It looks like new now.