Cold water wash

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by Sjixxxy, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. Sjixxxy

    Sjixxxy Member

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    OK. Right now the only convient place for me to wash prints only has cold water access where the water is running at around 49°F. Will there be any side effects with washing this cold? Will I have to modify the times or something like that?
     
  2. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    longer wash time

    test at Kodak and Ilford have concluded that the quickest...most efficient... wash water temperature for prints is 80ºF. Lower temperature means longer washes. The time required to get a thorough wash is determined by the fixer used and the fixing time etc. Hypo clearing agent substantially reduces washing time. The cheapest way to make a hypo clearing agent is to use a 2% sodium sulfite solution...20 grams of sodium sulphite to a liter of water. A very good source of sodium sulfite at prices much lower than the photo chemical suppliers is The chemistry Store (wwww.thechemistrystore.com). This is also a good place to by things like glycol and TEA etc. As an aside one of the best places for fixers and developing agents is techcheminc...(www.techcheminc.com.) very nice people with very much cheaper prices , although less items being stocked, than Photographer's Formulary.

    So "How much longer do you wash your prints". Buy a wash test from Photographer's Formulary. It is easily used with clear instructions and is the only way to answer with accuracy the completeness of your wash.
     
  3. Sjixxxy

    Sjixxxy Member

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    Well. I'm using TF-4 fixer, so I don't use any hypo, since at least by their instructions, it isn't required with that formula.
     
  4. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    Claire,

    Thanks for the idea. I need a little more help though please. I went to Photographer's Formulary, then store, and searched on “wash test”. Nothing came up. I think I need a more exact name.

    There is a Fixer test, but that as you know determines if your fixer bath is warn out.

    Thanks,

    John Powers
     
  5. oriecat

    oriecat Member

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    try hypo test
     
  6. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    That does it. Thanks.

    John
     
  7. JackRosa

    JackRosa Member

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    *********************************

    I use TF-4 fixer, as you do. 49F is a bit cold and I would be concerned with improper washing or washing times that are much too long. I don't like to keep my film or prints in water any longer than I absolutely have to - this applies especially to fiber-base prints.

    If at all possible for you, I would recommend water temperateures above 70F.
     
  8. Steve Weston

    Steve Weston Member

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    Have you tried using a hypo clearing bath such as Tetenal Lavaquick or Ilford gallerie wash aid. I use a Nova five slot archival washer connected to the baths cold water tap within inline Paterson water filter. I wash my prints for around ten minutes followed by a hypo clearing bath for the recommended time. Then its back into the washer for a period defined by how quick i am printing. As an amateur i am not banging out prints at a rapid rate of knots so they tend to be in the washer at least an hour before they are removed. I have yet to have any problems either when it comes to toning or over any long period of time.
     
  9. Ryuji

    Ryuji Member

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    It is specified in old ANSI standard and is commonly referred to as silver nitrate test for residual fixer. Formula is published and it's simple to mix. (Note: Use deionized water when mixing silver nitrate and keep the solution in dark when not in use.)