color film for paper negatives ??

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by jnanian, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    does anyone use color paper to make paper negatives?

    i know there are "pinholers" out there... you folks do this sort of thing ?

    its gotta be cheeper than 8x10 film :smile:

    TIA
    john
     
  2. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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  3. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    thanks for the link nick ...

    its good to know that i am not way off in left field :smile:

    -john
     
  4. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    People certainly do this, as RA-4 paper and processing chemicals are not expensive. As they mention on hte site, the paper can be reversal processed to make a positive. I have seen this once before; the colors are ot exactly perfect, but its a really cool effect.

    It's cheap; 100 sheets of 5x7 Kodak stuff is $15.95 at B&H.

    I'd imagine that you could even cut down a paper roll and put it into a rollfilm camera; wouldn't that be neat... though exposures would be lengthy, as I'd assume that the paper is close to B&W paper's speeds in the ISO 1 to 5 range.
     
  5. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    If you are hand processing the paper or can slow the speed of your processor, then Duraclear would make a great 'paper' neg.
     
  6. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    My idea was to do this for an ULF box camera. Even B&W film is expensive in ULF sizes. Using roll paper 10x20 or 12x36 or anything else could easily be done. I wasn't expecting 100% correct colour. That would likely be too much work.
     
  7. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Over on PN, Bujor was making paper negatives and positives in a camera using color paper.

    It is possible to cross process Endura paper and make direct positive prints, but the contrast is high and the subject matter and filtration must be chosen with care.

    Use Dektol 1:3 for 2' for the first developer, then a stop and reversal exposure. Then process as usual in the RA4 process and you can get a pretty good reversal print.

    PE
     
  8. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    thanks for all your input

    ... i was thinking of treating the color paper as i would a black and white paper negative and making a contact print from it, not a direct postive ... but after reading the suggestions on PN and here, i might
    change my thinking when i gather enough time+energy to do this sort of thing

    ... were there every dry(in)-dry(out) color print processors ? ( i am thinking of something like an ektamatic ( is that spelled right ? ) or Xray processor that people might use to make rc black ane white prints w/o having to deal with trays of chemicals ) ...

    - john
     
  9. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    There were lots of dry-in-dry-out processors but none that can be used the way you wish. Ektaflex is one that comes to mind as well as Ektaline and a few others. Some ran at rather high speed and took continuous rolls of paper.

    There are a series of small tank processors that Jobo sells for this purpose as well. The Nova series is very nice. I use their drum processor for B&W up to 16x20 as well as color.

    PE
     
  10. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    Doesn't Durst make a processor that comes in modules?
     
  11. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    One thing I've been wanting to ask. The Dektol first step is at what temp?
     
  12. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    The entire RA cross process can be run at 68 deg F (20 deg C).

    First deve 2'
    stop 30"
    wash 1 - 2'

    reversal exposure and room lights

    Color Dev (RA-RT) 2'
    Stop 30"
    Blix 2' - 4'
    wash 10' - 20'

    PE
     
  13. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    I only make RA-4 chemicals up in small amounts so I'd still likely run it in drums. Is the long wash because of the temps or the whole process?
     
  14. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Wash time is a function of temperature only. Go up in temp and down in time on a scale with 10 - 20 mins at 20 deg C and at the other end 2 - 3 mins at 40 deg C and you have the approximate nomograph with outer limits set and inner limits set.

    PE