Color print film.

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Mike Kennedy, Oct 16, 2005.

  1. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Member

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    Evening all.
    I was just given 8 rolls of 200 ISO color film. I have never heard of the manufacturer "Likon" and thought that if I pulled it to 160 or so I would get a more saturated print. Or do I have this back-assward.

    Mike
     
  2. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

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    You have it right. Test the film with the first few frames being of the same subject matter. Check the negs for detail and the resultant print.
     
  3. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    Well you won't really get a more saturated print, that would only be if the person or machine burns the negative for a longer time. That said, by ensuring that the colour layers all receive plenty of light, you are certain of getting the best possible colour print from the film.

    You will get a finer grain structure, by over exposing slightly, this works a treat and enables one to get really good definition from a faster film, while still having a slight speed gain from a lower speed film.

    Mick.
     
  4. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    FWIW, chances are "Likon" is a house brand and it's really re-badged film from Ferrania, Konica/Minolta, Agfa, or possibly Fuji. You can probably figure out which it is from the style of plastic film canister or from the place of manufacture stamped on the box (Italy = Ferrania, Japan = Konica/Minolta [or possibly Fuji], Germany = Agfa).