Color Sabattier effect with Fuji Superia 400

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by food goes in my mouf, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. food goes in my mouf

    food goes in my mouf Member

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    I recently managed to score a big lot of Fuji Superia 400 at a dirt cheap price and I want to do some Sabattier effects with it. I have a pretty good idea on what I'm doing and I don't mind making mistakes, but I have some questions I want to ask before starting. Most of them regarding to your personal opinion + experience.

    How is Superia at the Sabattier effect? (curiously, how is slide film at this?)

    I heard that it is best to do a 4 stop underexposure (in camera) if I were to flash the film, and do a massive push development. Is this true?

    Does the color of the light that I use to flash the film change the final outcome? Eg, Tungsten vs. Flourescent lightbulbs.

    Is it better to leave Sabattier effect at the printing stage?

    Has anyone ever done a Sabattier print of an "Sabattiered" negative?

    I am aware of the Solarization Demystified website: http://www.cchem.berkeley.edu/wljeme/SOUTLINE.html
    which seems to use Solarization and Sabattier interchangeably, and also spells Sabattier as Sabatier (Wikipedia spells it on the former). I hope that I'm using the terms correctly, and I thank you for your input.
     
  2. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Ok, you do solarization on film in-camera. You do Sabattier on film or prints during processing. This is the normal course of events.

    That should at least straighten you out to the scientific terminology used in a more rigorous manner.

    Solarization is often very nice with B&W and often poor with color. Basically it involves long exposures and bright lights along with filters.

    Sabattier can be done on film or prints with a short exposure to white or colored light, but the exposure times for film are often so short it is impractical to do.

    I have done Sabattier prints in color and have posted them in the gallery. I have simulated color on color, but have not posted them as one stage is digital due to the problems with film.

    PE
     
  3. food goes in my mouf

    food goes in my mouf Member

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    Re: Solarization vs. Sabattier - That is exactly what I thought.

    I was afraid of a response like this :-(

    But for what it's worth, my original idea was that I'd rig a an electronic flash 5 feet up and flash the negative. Would this too intense?
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    It may be. IDK. Try it. I would suggest a 5w bulb about 20 feet away as a starting point myself. That flash is way too much IMHO.

    PE
     
  5. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    I have flashed colour negative film halfway through the development process... mind you I was using a large dip and dunk machine and halfway through the development cylce we turned the room lights on and off for one steamboat.
    I plan to do this with 8x10 and 4x5 colour negative film this year for a specific project I have in mind.

    Very nice effect.. If you are rolling your film on a reel I am not so sure about even flow of light to the film closer to the core.
    If you are using 4x5 in hangers then its very easy ,, I do this every second weekend now with 8x10 and 4x4 FP4 for a project I am working on.
    Mr Jollys article is the best written that I have seen and was very accurate with his methods.. I have been able to follow his notes and get very predictable results.

    Give the colour a try if your darkroom and method of process allows you to do it.