Compact lens for 10/8

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by aluncrockford, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. aluncrockford

    aluncrockford Member

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    Having just bought a Tachihara 10/8 I need a small 300mm lens that in a perfect world will fold into the camera , I have been sent a Komura 6.3 commercial to try out ,it is not quite as small as I would like though it seems to be a lot faster than other tessar 300mm lenses. My questions are, is which lens would be considered the industry standard for small 300mm lenses ,and has anyone got any information on Komura commercial lenses

    Thanks

    Alun

    http://www.aluncrockford.com/
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    The Fujinon-C and Schneider G-Claron are popular modern choices for small lenses around 300mm that cover 8x10". You can have fast or small, but not both.
     
  3. Jesper

    Jesper Subscriber

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    I am very satisfied with Nikkor M300/9.
    And it is so small that I can leave it on the camera when I fold the it (Wista 810).
     
  4. aluncrockford

    aluncrockford Member

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    Thanks for information,are there any issues with coverage with the nikkor, and does the f9 aperture make the screen a viewing tricky in low light
     
  5. Jesper

    Jesper Subscriber

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    The image circle is 325mm which does not give too much room for movement, but in real life I have not been limited by this. I also have a Symmar 300/5,6 that I got becuse I thought I would need he coverage but so far I have never had the need for it (due to its weight and size it normally stays at home).
    Neither is there a problem with viewing the screen. I focus without loupe even out in the corners (I need a loupe focussing my 4x5).
    Naturally this is not a low level light lens, but any large format lens will be tricky to focus if the light is too low.

    Check out some of the reviews (I for one can recommend it)
    It takes 52mm filters (If you use Nikon for small format photography you already have filters).
     
  6. Mike1234

    Mike1234 Inactive

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    For anyone looking for one I have a near mint Nikkor 300-M for sale. PM if interested. Apug will get its share.
     
  7. John Kasaian

    John Kasaian Member

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    I'd go with the G-Claron.
    I have a Nikkor M and movements are limited, but there appears to be a bit of variation between samples as I know of some M users who get adequate wiggle room out of thier Ms.
    I have a 240 G Claron and it is one of my most used 8x10 lens.
    Both the G Claron and the M are bright when focusing. The G is single coated while the M is multi coated. The M is a tessar, the G isn't.
     
  8. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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  9. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Evaluating the groundglass image in low light involves a number of factors--the amount of light, your night vision, the aperture of the lens, the groundglass and aids like a fresnel lens, the effectiveness of the darkcloth and the ability of the photographer to use a darkcloth effectively, and also there is a question of attitude and patience. You have to be willing to wait under the darkcloth long enough for your eyes to adjust. When you can't see in the corners, you need to be able to imagine what the whole image looks like as you move your head around to see different parts of the groundglass. You need to be able to look through the cut corners of the groundglass, if you have them, or look at the groundglass from the other side through the lens to tell if there is vignetting or an undesirable amount of falloff of illumination. And sometimes, when you just can't see the entire image, you need to be able to look at the groundglass and then look at the scene directly and be able to project in your mind what the film will see that you can't see on the groundglass.
     
  10. John Kasaian

    John Kasaian Member

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    FWIW a 12" Dagor f/6.8 might be a good bet for you. Not as small as a G Claron but faster than a "G" and much smaller than slightly faster, more modern plasmats. Perhaps a workable compromise?
    I haven't had any problems focusing with a G Claron or an "M" or an Artar at f/9 if the light isn't fading, but as David Goldberg said about speed and size--- you can't have it both ways.