Contact papers

Discussion in 'Contact Printing' started by David Hall, Jan 24, 2003.

  1. David Hall

    David Hall Member

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    I am using Azo for 8x10 contact printing, and have used some enlarging papers such as Agfa and Ilfobrom, with decent results.

    But what other CONTACT papers are available? Frankly, I love how slow Azo is because I do this in the kitchen, and light fogging is always an issue with the significantly faster enlarging papers.

    Actually, maybe I should also be asking if there are super slow (Azo slow) enlarging papers out there?

    dgh
     
  2. carlweese

    carlweese Member

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    There aren't any other manufactured silver papers at contact speed, but of course the whole world of alternate processes is open to you. Platinum/palladium, kallitype, cyanotype are all slower still. Work takes place in ordinary subdued tungsten light, no safelight needed. Some hand made alternate processes are no more expensive than silver paper, and even platinum/palladium is not as expensive to do as some folks assume.
     
  3. brYan

    brYan Subscriber

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    I don't know of any slow enlarging papers, nothing like AZO.
     
  4. David Hall

    David Hall Member

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    I just finished a Michael Smith workshop. It's funny, after all I read about Azo and Amidol...everything from toxicity to his exacting formula, I expected to have to wear one of those hazmat suits and have a high school chem lab to mix the stuff. But is amazingly simple. Easier than most other developers I have used over time. And there really is nothing like a contact print on Azo with those Amidol blacks and midtone separations.

    dgh
     
  5. LFGuy

    LFGuy Member

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    There's also Centennial POP paper you can get. I've never tried it, but there's some excellent pictures on this paper in one of the galleries (technical one, IIRC).
     
  6. edbuffaloe

    edbuffaloe Member

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    Bergger makes a contact paper. I don't like it as well as Azo, but it isn't bad either.
     
  7. SteveGangi

    SteveGangi Member

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    I like Azo also, and cyanotype. Jorge likes platinum-palladium. I like the look it has but have not tried it yet (lazy maybe?). I may try albumen too if and when I get around to it.
     
  8. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I've finally got around to using Bergger Art Contact as it's supposed to be used - not as a slow enlarging paper, but as a relatively fast contact paper.
    I developed in Ansco 130, which seems to have been a good choise.

    I'm converted. My 5x7" camera will see a lot more work next year - this was amazing (not that the paper is poor as enlarger paper)!

    I have never tried Azo, nor seen good examples of it. I do however have a fairly good selection of prints from around 1870-1920, with examples practically all the popular techniques of the time. I still say the Bergger paper is very, very good.

    I may try Azo. I may try albumen. But I might just decide to save my money towards an 8x10" camera...
     
  9. Aggie

    Aggie Member

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    ..
     
  10. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Aggie, that would make me very happy indeed!

    I'd better start thinking of exposing some more film soon - I see a need for BIG negatives :wink:

    Expect a Berger contact print in your mail one of these days.
     
  11. Black Dog

    Black Dog Member

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    I've tried the Berger paper and the results are encouraging (using Beers developer and Forte 200 negs). It's even quicker to respond to selenium than Fortezo.
     
  12. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    Ole, if you are exposing for azo, figure about a stop of extra development on the high end for a "normal" negative and grade 2 azo. This should get you close to begin with. If you have grade 3 azo, a normal negative should print well enough to start getting used to it. My prints from 4x5 on sunday showed good separation in zone 2 and up. These were developed for grade 2 enlarging paper with PMK pyro. If you have any numbers already for ABC pyro and N+1this would be an ideal starting point for you.

    For light in 4x5 format, try a 25 watt bulb at 50 cm on grade 3 paper for 30-60 seconds and see where you end up. I'm still using 8x10 paper cut into quarters for 4x5 film until I have a better grasp of things. I have read where azo doesn't dry down much. This has not been my experience. Figure 1/2 zone anyway for dry-down. Do a series of prints at 15 second intervals and let them dry.

    I will be very curious to see how you like this paper for work.