Contact printing colour papers

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by tomalophicon, Apr 3, 2011.

  1. tomalophicon

    tomalophicon Member

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    Hello,
    I'm wondering if anyone knows the outcome of printing slides to RA-4, then contact printing the negative images back to positives?
    :whistling:
    Cheers,
    Tom.
     
  2. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    You get "Fuji Crystal Archive" across the pictures?
     
  3. tomalophicon

    tomalophicon Member

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    Do they have that written on the back of them?

    Are there any colour papers for contact printing?
     
  4. jpberger

    jpberger Member

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    Well most Ra4 paper is opaque of course-- Are you thinking about contact printing onto duratrans or something? It might work, but it would be a royal pain and technical quality would not be that great. Unless you have some sort of particular aesthetic in mind I think a trip to the d*****L dark side and printing scans on Ra-4 via lightjet would be the best way to go, unless you want to make Ilfochromes, or have them made.
     
  5. tomalophicon

    tomalophicon Member

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    I shudder at the thought of anything digital.

    So JPberger, you say most papers are opaque, what are the ones that aren't!
     
  6. E76

    E76 Member

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    If you're serious about printing your slides Ilfochrome is really the only way to go. Creating positive prints in the way you describe will yield, as they say, "less than optimal results." The negative image will have very high contrast, and the positive image will more than likely have poor tone and color. If you must RA4 paper, you will need to create internegatives from your slides and then make prints from them.
     
  7. tomalophicon

    tomalophicon Member

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    Cheers.
    I suppose I will have to use negative films which isn't a bad thing really.
    I just really like slides :sad:
     
  8. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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  9. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Subscriber

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    Ilfochrome is easy (if you don't get into contrast masking - depends on your originals) and the results are great.* It's just rather absurdly expensive these days. If you like shooting slides and can handle the price of Ilfochrome, go for it.

    *Assuming it's still the same or better stuff than what I printed in the 90s.
     
  10. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    It's expensive at around $100 for 2 L of home-use chemistry, plus the cost of paper. But if you want that look (and it is a very specific look), there is nothing like it. It is also nearly impossible to get best results all the time without masking. As long as your masks are simple contrast adjustment masks, it is not too hard, though. Definitely nothing worth giving up on the process over. I haven't printed Ilfochrome for several years, but I want to get back to it soon. I took the class at Santa Monica Collge, and did it for a while at home after that, but I dropped it when I stopped shooting so much 4x5 in studio, which is where I made my largest use of transparency film.
     
  11. hrst

    hrst Member

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    I don't see point in making a paper internegative with RA-4 paper as you describe -- the paper has contrast too high for internegatives -- why not make film internegative? "Copy film" is not available (if you don't want to use the cine products, process ECN-2), but try the films that are available. They are good for shooting very different scenes with very different lighting, so I would bet they are quite good in capturing the slides, too.

    There are three choices then;

    1) Internegative of the same size as the original, contact printed from the original, then enlarged to the paper.
    + easy, cheap to make
    - a small loss of definition
    2) Enlarged internegative to the final size, then contact printed on paper
    - expensive
    + the best possible definition
    3) Enlarged internegative, but not in the final size. Again enlarged on the paper (e.g. 6x4.5 or 6x9 copy from 35mm)
    Something between 1 and 2, but as you enlarge it twice, the definition is more related to the lens, film holders and your ability to focus. Might be very good in the best case.

    I would just go with 1 unless you want to make a very large print in which case I would go with 3.

    As for copy film, experiment with either Portra 160 or Ektar 100 depending on if you want exaggerated colors or not.
    - Bracket the exposures to find the best exposure time.
    - If needed, adjust contrast by changing C-41 developer time. For lower contrast, increase exposure by 1/2 stop and develop for 30 seconds less; for higher contrast, decrease exposure by 1/2 stop and develop for 30 seconds more. Or something like that.
    - Try to get daylight balanced light from your enlarger when copying the film. I have found something like 30C 15M 0Y to be quite close but this depends on enlarger. It's not that critical, of course you also have your normal controls when making the final print.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 5, 2011